2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158660
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement of Depressive Symptoms after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Measurement of Depressive Symptoms after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bay, Esther, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:2106 Kratage Ct, East Lansing, MI, 48382, USA
Co-Authors:Bonnie Hagerty, PhD, Associate Professor; Reg Williams, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Nearly 77% of those recovering from brain injury experience depression, regardless of the severity of injury. Still, some argue that the incidence of depression cannot be accurately depicted because of measurement constraints and difficulties distinguishing depression from somatic complaints. The purpose of this study was to compare a relatively new measure of depressive symptoms, the Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory (NFI), with two other measures of depressive symptoms, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression (CES-D) scale and the Profile of Mood States (POMS)™. Further, this study examined the reliability of self-report information from persons with TBI by comparing their responses with a relative/significant other. Finally, relationships were examined between symptoms of brain injury and depression. Data were collected from persons who were involved or had been involved in a formal out-patient rehabilitation program. Seventy-five persons who were between 1-24 months of a mild or moderate brain injury and their relative/significant other participated. Results indicated that all measures were significantly correlated. Using published cut-offs of the CES-D, nearly two-thirds of this community sample had mild to severe levels of depressive symptoms. Using the NFI-D scale, the relative/significant other rated the survivors’ depression significantly greater than the injured person, yet there were no differences on the CES-D. Somatic complaints did correlate moderately with depression scores, perhaps indicating a level of distress associated with brain injury symptoms. The CES-D, POMS-D and NFI-D were equally able to measure depression after TBI in a sample of mild-to-moderate brain injury. There was concordance between relative/significant other and patient ratings. Moderate correlations were present between perceived physical symptoms associated with the injury and depression, indicating a need for a repeated measures design to better determine the relationship between depression and brain injury symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement of Depressive Symptoms after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158660-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measurement of Depressive Symptoms after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2106 Kratage Ct, East Lansing, MI, 48382, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Hagerty, PhD, Associate Professor; Reg Williams, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nearly 77% of those recovering from brain injury experience depression, regardless of the severity of injury. Still, some argue that the incidence of depression cannot be accurately depicted because of measurement constraints and difficulties distinguishing depression from somatic complaints. The purpose of this study was to compare a relatively new measure of depressive symptoms, the Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory (NFI), with two other measures of depressive symptoms, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression (CES-D) scale and the Profile of Mood States (POMS)&trade;. Further, this study examined the reliability of self-report information from persons with TBI by comparing their responses with a relative/significant other. Finally, relationships were examined between symptoms of brain injury and depression. Data were collected from persons who were involved or had been involved in a formal out-patient rehabilitation program. Seventy-five persons who were between 1-24 months of a mild or moderate brain injury and their relative/significant other participated. Results indicated that all measures were significantly correlated. Using published cut-offs of the CES-D, nearly two-thirds of this community sample had mild to severe levels of depressive symptoms. Using the NFI-D scale, the relative/significant other rated the survivors&rsquo; depression significantly greater than the injured person, yet there were no differences on the CES-D. Somatic complaints did correlate moderately with depression scores, perhaps indicating a level of distress associated with brain injury symptoms. The CES-D, POMS-D and NFI-D were equally able to measure depression after TBI in a sample of mild-to-moderate brain injury. There was concordance between relative/significant other and patient ratings. Moderate correlations were present between perceived physical symptoms associated with the injury and depression, indicating a need for a repeated measures design to better determine the relationship between depression and brain injury symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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