2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parents' Views on Teaching Their Children about Sexuality
Abstract:
Parents' Views on Teaching Their Children about Sexuality
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Beausang, Carol, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:IUPUI
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Few issues cause parents as much anxiety as teaching their children about sexuality. Experts suggest that parents begin to teach them when they are young. However, few people, regardless of age, report that their parents conveyed positive messages about healthy sexuality to them during childhood. The purpose of this study was to describe parents' views on teaching their children about sexuality in order to assess what they need to feel relatively comfortable and supported in this role. Social Learning Theory guided study-related decisions. Participants were parents whose oldest children were from three to ten years of age. Purposeful sampling was used. Focus groups of parents were interviewed using a structured guide of nine open-ended questions. Responses to the questions were tape recorded and then transcribed. Data were analyzed according to principles and procedures described by Krueger (1998). Fifteen parents in three focus groups participated in the study. In each group one or two parents demonstrated a high degree of comfort with the role of sexuality educator. Other parents indicated that they were unaware of how to use "teachable moments" in everyday life, uncertain as to what was appropriate to teach children when, and concerned about potential negative reactions from other parents that might reflect on them and their children. Of particular interest was the interaction that the interview questions stimulated among study participants. Conclusions include the demonstrated need to inform and support parents in their role as sexuality educators for their children. Inasmuch as sexuality is a sensitive, value-laden issue, people that parents know and trust who are also comfortable teaching children about sexuality may serve as important role models for other parents who are open to assuming this responsibility.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParents' Views on Teaching Their Children about Sexualityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parents' Views on Teaching Their Children about Sexuality</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beausang, Carol, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IUPUI</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Few issues cause parents as much anxiety as teaching their children about sexuality. Experts suggest that parents begin to teach them when they are young. However, few people, regardless of age, report that their parents conveyed positive messages about healthy sexuality to them during childhood. The purpose of this study was to describe parents' views on teaching their children about sexuality in order to assess what they need to feel relatively comfortable and supported in this role. Social Learning Theory guided study-related decisions. Participants were parents whose oldest children were from three to ten years of age. Purposeful sampling was used. Focus groups of parents were interviewed using a structured guide of nine open-ended questions. Responses to the questions were tape recorded and then transcribed. Data were analyzed according to principles and procedures described by Krueger (1998). Fifteen parents in three focus groups participated in the study. In each group one or two parents demonstrated a high degree of comfort with the role of sexuality educator. Other parents indicated that they were unaware of how to use &quot;teachable moments&quot; in everyday life, uncertain as to what was appropriate to teach children when, and concerned about potential negative reactions from other parents that might reflect on them and their children. Of particular interest was the interaction that the interview questions stimulated among study participants. Conclusions include the demonstrated need to inform and support parents in their role as sexuality educators for their children. Inasmuch as sexuality is a sensitive, value-laden issue, people that parents know and trust who are also comfortable teaching children about sexuality may serve as important role models for other parents who are open to assuming this responsibility.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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