2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158664
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Women’s Strategies for Coping with Prejudice in Healthcare
Abstract:
African American Women’s Strategies for Coping with Prejudice in Healthcare
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Benkert, Ramona, PhD, RN, CS
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 370 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
African American clients’ have reported racism and prejudice in health care; yet, there is limited documentation of the strategies used to cope with these experiences. Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe African American women’s perceptions of prejudice in healthcare and the strategies used to cope with the experiences. Subjects: Twenty women from an urban area in the Midwest participated in the study. The 20 women ranged in age from 26 to 74 years. Ten of the women had a high school or greater education and their annual income ranged from $2,100 to $25,000. Method: This qualitative study used the constructivist perspective of Interpretive Interactionism for paradigmatic and methodological guidance. The interviews with the 20 African American women were part of a larger study of cross-racial relationships. The interview guide consisted of five areas; this paper describes the analysis from two areas: the women’s history with the health care system and the skills used with health care providers. Two African American graduate students performed the interviews. Results: The analysis provided two core themes: experiences with the "White health care system" and strategies for coping with the "prejudice". The participants’ descriptions of the health care system and their interactions were consistent with Denzin’s construct, interactions; they were symbolic and problematic for many participants. After exposure to the “White health care system”, patients described coping strategies they had used, which included: a) getting angry, b) learning to unlearn, c) being assertive and d) walking away. Discussion: The processes described by these women in working with a “White dominant” health care system were similar to the coping strategies used by all African Americans in a White dominant US society. Acknowledgements: The author thanks MNRS for funding this research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Women’s Strategies for Coping with Prejudice in Healthcareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158664-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">African American Women&rsquo;s Strategies for Coping with Prejudice in Healthcare </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benkert, Ramona, PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 370 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African American clients&rsquo; have reported racism and prejudice in health care; yet, there is limited documentation of the strategies used to cope with these experiences. Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe African American women&rsquo;s perceptions of prejudice in healthcare and the strategies used to cope with the experiences. Subjects: Twenty women from an urban area in the Midwest participated in the study. The 20 women ranged in age from 26 to 74 years. Ten of the women had a high school or greater education and their annual income ranged from $2,100 to $25,000. Method: This qualitative study used the constructivist perspective of Interpretive Interactionism for paradigmatic and methodological guidance. The interviews with the 20 African American women were part of a larger study of cross-racial relationships. The interview guide consisted of five areas; this paper describes the analysis from two areas: the women&rsquo;s history with the health care system and the skills used with health care providers. Two African American graduate students performed the interviews. Results: The analysis provided two core themes: experiences with the &quot;White health care system&quot; and strategies for coping with the &quot;prejudice&quot;. The participants&rsquo; descriptions of the health care system and their interactions were consistent with Denzin&rsquo;s construct, interactions; they were symbolic and problematic for many participants. After exposure to the &ldquo;White health care system&rdquo;, patients described coping strategies they had used, which included: a) getting angry, b) learning to unlearn, c) being assertive and d) walking away. Discussion: The processes described by these women in working with a &ldquo;White dominant&rdquo; health care system were similar to the coping strategies used by all African Americans in a White dominant US society. Acknowledgements: The author thanks MNRS for funding this research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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