2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158667
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Related Beliefs and Behaviors
Abstract:
Related Beliefs and Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Burns, Kenneth, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn Frank-Stromborg, EdD, JD, FAAN, Professor & Chair School of Nursing
The purpose of this study was to assess levels of residential radon, knowledge and beliefs about radon, history of radon testing, and mitigation intention based on radon level test results. Conceptual Framework: The Risk Perception Model asserts that response to environmental issues is governed by perceptions of risk. Risk perception is mediated by the factors of perceived degree of individual control, severity of the hazard, and the nature of the source of the hazard. Subjects: The sample consisted of 1,183 subjects who were predominantly Caucasian, female and 30 to 55 years of age or older; 50% of the residences were rural. Method: A stratified random sample of residences in DeKalb County was used. In Phase I, a letter offering free radon testing in exchange for completing a brief survey about radon was mailed to sample residences. Upon receipt of a completed survey each respondent was mailed two radon test kits, testing instructions, and a radon information brochure. The research team received the radon test results. In Phase II, respondents received their radon test results, a radon mitigation brochure and a follow-up survey. Results: Average residential radon levels exceeded the EPA’s action level in 30% of homes tested, and maximum radon levels exceeded the action level in 46% of homes. Respondents generally had low levels of radon knowledge and many were uncertain regarding the severity of radon risks or their own risks of exposure. Radon mitigation efforts were planned by 61% of those with elevated radon levels. Conclusions: Knowledge or radon among members of the general public remains low, and testing and mitigation efforts remain relatively rare. Results suggest that rural individuals and those of lower socioeconomic status may be at particular risk of radon exposure and should be targeted with outreach efforts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelated Beliefs and Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158667-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Related Beliefs and Behaviors </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burns, Kenneth, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Frank-Stromborg, EdD, JD, FAAN, Professor &amp; Chair School of Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to assess levels of residential radon, knowledge and beliefs about radon, history of radon testing, and mitigation intention based on radon level test results. Conceptual Framework: The Risk Perception Model asserts that response to environmental issues is governed by perceptions of risk. Risk perception is mediated by the factors of perceived degree of individual control, severity of the hazard, and the nature of the source of the hazard. Subjects: The sample consisted of 1,183 subjects who were predominantly Caucasian, female and 30 to 55 years of age or older; 50% of the residences were rural. Method: A stratified random sample of residences in DeKalb County was used. In Phase I, a letter offering free radon testing in exchange for completing a brief survey about radon was mailed to sample residences. Upon receipt of a completed survey each respondent was mailed two radon test kits, testing instructions, and a radon information brochure. The research team received the radon test results. In Phase II, respondents received their radon test results, a radon mitigation brochure and a follow-up survey. Results: Average residential radon levels exceeded the EPA&rsquo;s action level in 30% of homes tested, and maximum radon levels exceeded the action level in 46% of homes. Respondents generally had low levels of radon knowledge and many were uncertain regarding the severity of radon risks or their own risks of exposure. Radon mitigation efforts were planned by 61% of those with elevated radon levels. Conclusions: Knowledge or radon among members of the general public remains low, and testing and mitigation efforts remain relatively rare. Results suggest that rural individuals and those of lower socioeconomic status may be at particular risk of radon exposure and should be targeted with outreach efforts. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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