Predictors of Fat Intake Behaviors Differs between Normal Weight and Obese Low-Income Young Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158670
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Fat Intake Behaviors Differs between Normal Weight and Obese Low-Income Young Mothers
Abstract:
Predictors of Fat Intake Behaviors Differs between Normal Weight and Obese Low-Income Young Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chang, Mei-Wei, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, A130 Life Sciences Building,, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Co-Authors:Linda C. Baumann, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Susan Nitzke, PhD, RD, Professor; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor
Elimination of health disparities and reduction of excessive dietary fat intake are national goals as stated in Healthy People 2010. Low-income women suffer a disproportionately high burden of diet-related health problems such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. Purposes: To determine whether predictors of fat intake behaviors were the same for normal weight or obese low-income women when using the PRECEDE-PROCEDE model and to identify predictors for each group. Design: Proportional stratified convenience sampling. Subjects: 581 non-pregnant black and white normal weight or obese women. Settings: Women, Infants, and Children program sites in 6 counties in southern Wisconsin. Measures: Independent variables included predisposing (beliefs in diet and health, beliefs in diet and body shape, health concerns in food choice, health concerns in nutrition, eating habits), enabling (cost of food, availability of time to prepare food, accessibility to purchase food), and reinforcing (weight control, sensory appeal, mood) factors. The dependent variable was fat intake behaviors. Structural equation modeling was performed. Results: After controlling for covariates, factors affecting fat intake behaviors differed between the normal weight and obese groups. Reinforcing and enabling but not predisposing factors were important in determining fat intake behaviors for the obese group. For the normal weight group, only reinforcing factors affected fat intake behaviors. Conclusions: Interventions to modify low-income women’s fat intake behaviors may benefit by targeting behavioral predictors that differ with body size. Messages that emphasize reinforcing factors are likely to affect both normal weight and obese women. Information about enabling factors is likely to be more effective with obese women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Fat Intake Behaviors Differs between Normal Weight and Obese Low-Income Young Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158670-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Fat Intake Behaviors Differs between Normal Weight and Obese Low-Income Young Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Mei-Wei, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, A130 Life Sciences Building,, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda C. Baumann, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Susan Nitzke, PhD, RD, Professor; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Elimination of health disparities and reduction of excessive dietary fat intake are national goals as stated in Healthy People 2010. Low-income women suffer a disproportionately high burden of diet-related health problems such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. Purposes: To determine whether predictors of fat intake behaviors were the same for normal weight or obese low-income women when using the PRECEDE-PROCEDE model and to identify predictors for each group. Design: Proportional stratified convenience sampling. Subjects: 581 non-pregnant black and white normal weight or obese women. Settings: Women, Infants, and Children program sites in 6 counties in southern Wisconsin. Measures: Independent variables included predisposing (beliefs in diet and health, beliefs in diet and body shape, health concerns in food choice, health concerns in nutrition, eating habits), enabling (cost of food, availability of time to prepare food, accessibility to purchase food), and reinforcing (weight control, sensory appeal, mood) factors. The dependent variable was fat intake behaviors. Structural equation modeling was performed. Results: After controlling for covariates, factors affecting fat intake behaviors differed between the normal weight and obese groups. Reinforcing and enabling but not predisposing factors were important in determining fat intake behaviors for the obese group. For the normal weight group, only reinforcing factors affected fat intake behaviors. Conclusions: Interventions to modify low-income women&rsquo;s fat intake behaviors may benefit by targeting behavioral predictors that differ with body size. Messages that emphasize reinforcing factors are likely to affect both normal weight and obese women. Information about enabling factors is likely to be more effective with obese women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:16:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:16:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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