2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158671
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents
Abstract:
Knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Cheng, Ching-Yu, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, 1700 Red River , Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Co-Authors:Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN,CNS, Associate Professor
Few studies on menstruation have explored gender differences in knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation, especially among Taiwanese adolescents. Although men do not menstruate, their knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation can influence women’s health behaviors related to menstruation. The purpose of this study was to explore gender differences in knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents. This study was a secondary analysis of a descriptive study conducted in South Taiwan. All first grade students in the biggest junior high school in a metropolitan city in South Taiwan were invited to participate. 287 female and 269 male students completed the questionnaires. The response rate was 87.42%. Two questionnaires developed for the study included participants’ knowledge about menstruation, information sources for the knowledge, and overall feeling about menstruation. The Cronbach’s alpha for the questionnaires were .85 for male, .64 for female, and .83 for the combined. Male students were asked to answer questions based on their views on menstruating women while female students were asked to answer questions about their own health behaviors related to menstruation and views on menstruation. Data were analyzed using t-tests and X2 tests. The findings indicated gender differences in knowledge level (t=-4.965, p=.000) and views on menstruation (t=3.936, p=.000). 37% of female students and 24% of male students did not know the relationship between menstruation and ovulation (X2=10.908, p=.001). 48% of female students and 36% of male students believed that a pregnant woman could menstruate (X2=7.715, p=.005). The most frequently used term to describe menstruating women by male students was “bad temper” (72.7%). 71% of the participants received information from schools, and about half of the participants were aware of tabooed behaviors related to menstruation. The findings suggest the needs for evaluation of sex education programs in Taiwan and for open discussions on menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158671-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cheng, Ching-Yu, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1700 Red River , Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN,CNS, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Few studies on menstruation have explored gender differences in knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation, especially among Taiwanese adolescents. Although men do not menstruate, their knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation can influence women&rsquo;s health behaviors related to menstruation. The purpose of this study was to explore gender differences in knowledge and attitudes toward menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents. This study was a secondary analysis of a descriptive study conducted in South Taiwan. All first grade students in the biggest junior high school in a metropolitan city in South Taiwan were invited to participate. 287 female and 269 male students completed the questionnaires. The response rate was 87.42%. Two questionnaires developed for the study included participants&rsquo; knowledge about menstruation, information sources for the knowledge, and overall feeling about menstruation. The Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha for the questionnaires were .85 for male, .64 for female, and .83 for the combined. Male students were asked to answer questions based on their views on menstruating women while female students were asked to answer questions about their own health behaviors related to menstruation and views on menstruation. Data were analyzed using t-tests and X2 tests. The findings indicated gender differences in knowledge level (t=-4.965, p=.000) and views on menstruation (t=3.936, p=.000). 37% of female students and 24% of male students did not know the relationship between menstruation and ovulation (X2=10.908, p=.001). 48% of female students and 36% of male students believed that a pregnant woman could menstruate (X2=7.715, p=.005). The most frequently used term to describe menstruating women by male students was &ldquo;bad temper&rdquo; (72.7%). 71% of the participants received information from schools, and about half of the participants were aware of tabooed behaviors related to menstruation. The findings suggest the needs for evaluation of sex education programs in Taiwan and for open discussions on menstruation among Taiwanese adolescents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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