2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158672
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Family Matters: Recruiting Low-income African American Families
Abstract:
The Family Matters: Recruiting Low-income African American Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Dallas, Constance, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Maternal-Child Nursing - #854 m/c 802, 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Co-Authors:Kathleen Norr, PhD; Barbara Dancy, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Kavanaugh Karen, PhD, RN, Dr.; Cassata Linda, PhD, RN; Raymond Thompson, MSW
We will describe recruitment and retention strategies for the completed pilot study and the ongoing NINR-funded qualitative exploratory descriptive longitudinal study to systematically describe the influence of the paternal-maternal kinship system on unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent fatherhood over time (from late pregnancy until two years after birth). A paternal-maternal kinship system includes the adolescent father and his parents and the adolescent mother and her parents. Consistent with African American culture, a parent is defined as a biological parent or an adult living in the household of that adolescent parent who, in the opinion of either the adolescent or the adolescent's resident parent, is acting in a parenting role for the adolescent. Recruitment involves three stages: (1) initial identification of at least one member of a paternal-maternal kinship system, (2) obtaining verbal agreement and verifying eligibility from at least four key members, and (3) obtaining formal signed consent of all participants. Adolescent fathers and their families often shape the behaviors of adolescent mothers, participate in caring for the infants, and influence the outcomes of clinical practice interventions. Yet, this population is seriously understudied. Clinicians who may remember to include mothers of adolescent mothers may exclude and adolescent fathers and their families from full participation in prenatal care and during early childhood. Present models of paternal involvement, which are neither culturally specific nor developmentally appropriate, are based upon adult, married, Caucasian males and middle-class family ideals. However, cultural and developmental health care is more relevant to clients' needs, may be more acceptable and accessible, and may help reduce health disparities. Studying the perspectives of two generations, adolescent parents and grandparents, provides a comprehensive description of the process of paternal involvement for unmarried adolescent fathers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Family Matters: Recruiting Low-income African American Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158672-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Family Matters: Recruiting Low-income African American Families </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dallas, Constance, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal-Child Nursing - #854 m/c 802, 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Norr, PhD; Barbara Dancy, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Kavanaugh Karen, PhD, RN, Dr.; Cassata Linda, PhD, RN; Raymond Thompson, MSW </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">We will describe recruitment and retention strategies for the completed pilot study and the ongoing NINR-funded qualitative exploratory descriptive longitudinal study to systematically describe the influence of the paternal-maternal kinship system on unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent fatherhood over time (from late pregnancy until two years after birth). A paternal-maternal kinship system includes the adolescent father and his parents and the adolescent mother and her parents. Consistent with African American culture, a parent is defined as a biological parent or an adult living in the household of that adolescent parent who, in the opinion of either the adolescent or the adolescent's resident parent, is acting in a parenting role for the adolescent. Recruitment involves three stages: (1) initial identification of at least one member of a paternal-maternal kinship system, (2) obtaining verbal agreement and verifying eligibility from at least four key members, and (3) obtaining formal signed consent of all participants. Adolescent fathers and their families often shape the behaviors of adolescent mothers, participate in caring for the infants, and influence the outcomes of clinical practice interventions. Yet, this population is seriously understudied. Clinicians who may remember to include mothers of adolescent mothers may exclude and adolescent fathers and their families from full participation in prenatal care and during early childhood. Present models of paternal involvement, which are neither culturally specific nor developmentally appropriate, are based upon adult, married, Caucasian males and middle-class family ideals. However, cultural and developmental health care is more relevant to clients' needs, may be more acceptable and accessible, and may help reduce health disparities. Studying the perspectives of two generations, adolescent parents and grandparents, provides a comprehensive description of the process of paternal involvement for unmarried adolescent fathers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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