2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158673
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Public School Teachers' Knowledge of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents
Abstract:
Public School Teachers' Knowledge of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Fox, Kami, BSN, RN
Contact Address:CON, 136 Reed Street, New Bremen, OH, 45869-8606, USA
Co-Authors:Cynthia Gibbons, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Nurses working with families, children and adolescents diagnosed with diabetes need to be concerned about health promotion and prevention of complications. Students diagnosed with diabetes have special needs identified and provided for in PL 94-192. However, past research has found that teachers are not well prepared in areas of pediatric chronic illnesses and may not have access to a school nurse. The Comprehensive School Health Program was used as the conceptual framework. A modified version of a questionnaire developed in Utah (Lindsay, Jarrett, and Hillam, 1987) was used for the partial replication, descriptive study to examine teachers’ knowledge of diabetes and determine if there were differences between school districts. Five new questions were added to the questionnaire regarding Type 2 diabetes in youth and use of an insulin pump. The questionnaires were given to teachers in a rural Midwest county. Three hundred and fifty-four questionnaires were distributed and 187 (52.8%) were returned. The average total score on the 16 item multiple choice questionnaire was 69.2% out of 100% (SD=2.309). There were no significant differences in the total scores between school districts, but teachers in two districts scored significantly higher (p=.014) than the others on the daily management section. No unique identifiers were shared between the two districts, but results may have been related to teachers’ experiences. Teachers in school districts that did not employ a school nurse scored significantly higher (p=.051) than teachers in districts that did employ a school nurse. It was surmised that when a district employed a school nurse, the teachers relied on the nurse and did not see a need to educate themselves regarding diabetes. These findings can be used by advanced practice nurses, school nurses and diabetes nurse educators to collaborate with school districts and plan educational programs for teachers employed in rural public schools.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePublic School Teachers' Knowledge of Diabetes in Children and Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158673-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Public School Teachers' Knowledge of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fox, Kami, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 136 Reed Street, New Bremen, OH, 45869-8606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia Gibbons, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses working with families, children and adolescents diagnosed with diabetes need to be concerned about health promotion and prevention of complications. Students diagnosed with diabetes have special needs identified and provided for in PL 94-192. However, past research has found that teachers are not well prepared in areas of pediatric chronic illnesses and may not have access to a school nurse. The Comprehensive School Health Program was used as the conceptual framework. A modified version of a questionnaire developed in Utah (Lindsay, Jarrett, and Hillam, 1987) was used for the partial replication, descriptive study to examine teachers&rsquo; knowledge of diabetes and determine if there were differences between school districts. Five new questions were added to the questionnaire regarding Type 2 diabetes in youth and use of an insulin pump. The questionnaires were given to teachers in a rural Midwest county. Three hundred and fifty-four questionnaires were distributed and 187 (52.8%) were returned. The average total score on the 16 item multiple choice questionnaire was 69.2% out of 100% (SD=2.309). There were no significant differences in the total scores between school districts, but teachers in two districts scored significantly higher (p=.014) than the others on the daily management section. No unique identifiers were shared between the two districts, but results may have been related to teachers&rsquo; experiences. Teachers in school districts that did not employ a school nurse scored significantly higher (p=.051) than teachers in districts that did employ a school nurse. It was surmised that when a district employed a school nurse, the teachers relied on the nurse and did not see a need to educate themselves regarding diabetes. These findings can be used by advanced practice nurses, school nurses and diabetes nurse educators to collaborate with school districts and plan educational programs for teachers employed in rural public schools.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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