Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Rationale for Providing Physical Care for Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158675
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Rationale for Providing Physical Care for Elders
Abstract:
Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Rationale for Providing Physical Care for Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ganong, Lawrence, PhD
Contact Address:Sinclair SON, 313 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn Coleman, PhD; Jason Hans, MS; Elizabeth Sharp, PhD; Tanja Rothrauff, BS; Tia Schultz, BA; Scott Tobias, MS; Melinda Stafford, BS
Research on racial and ethnic differences in intergenerational obligations has been relatively sparse; most studies on intergenerational helping have not included racially and ethnically diverse samples. This is a significant limitation, given demographic changes in the United States. Although not all researchers report differences, Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans generally report greater felt obligations than white non-Hispanic Americans do. Such differences are usually attributed to differences in cultural traditions in which filial obligations are valued more in some racial and ethnic groups than in others. In order to understand fully the normative and personal beliefs about filial obligations in a multi-ethnic society such as the United States, it is imperative that researchers examine racial and ethnic groups other than white non-Hispanic Americans. In this project we examined filial obligations among a nationally representative sample of over 3, 000 Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and white, non-Hispanic Americans. Using random digit dialing and an innovative multiple-segment vignette approach, both qualitative and quantitative data were gathered. We were interested in the rationale underlying decisions to assist or to not assist elder family members needing various types of assistance, such as help with activities of daily, living, caregiving, and emotional support. Although the qualitative data analyses are still in progress, preliminary analyses indicate that rationale for helping differs between racial groups primarily when the older adult is not a parent. For parents and other older adults, such as stepparents, reasons for lending aid do not differ substantially between ethnic groups. Implications of the findings for nurses and other health care professionals will be discussed in this presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRacial and Ethnic Differences in the Rationale for Providing Physical Care for Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158675-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Rationale for Providing Physical Care for Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ganong, Lawrence, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair SON, 313 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Coleman, PhD; Jason Hans, MS; Elizabeth Sharp, PhD; Tanja Rothrauff, BS; Tia Schultz, BA; Scott Tobias, MS; Melinda Stafford, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research on racial and ethnic differences in intergenerational obligations has been relatively sparse; most studies on intergenerational helping have not included racially and ethnically diverse samples. This is a significant limitation, given demographic changes in the United States. Although not all researchers report differences, Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans generally report greater felt obligations than white non-Hispanic Americans do. Such differences are usually attributed to differences in cultural traditions in which filial obligations are valued more in some racial and ethnic groups than in others. In order to understand fully the normative and personal beliefs about filial obligations in a multi-ethnic society such as the United States, it is imperative that researchers examine racial and ethnic groups other than white non-Hispanic Americans. In this project we examined filial obligations among a nationally representative sample of over 3, 000 Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and white, non-Hispanic Americans. Using random digit dialing and an innovative multiple-segment vignette approach, both qualitative and quantitative data were gathered. We were interested in the rationale underlying decisions to assist or to not assist elder family members needing various types of assistance, such as help with activities of daily, living, caregiving, and emotional support. Although the qualitative data analyses are still in progress, preliminary analyses indicate that rationale for helping differs between racial groups primarily when the older adult is not a parent. For parents and other older adults, such as stepparents, reasons for lending aid do not differ substantially between ethnic groups. Implications of the findings for nurses and other health care professionals will be discussed in this presentation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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