Effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program: A Video-based Intervention for Families of Color

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program: A Video-based Intervention for Families of Color
Abstract:
Effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program: A Video-based Intervention for Families of Color
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Garvey, Christine, DNSc
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Community and Mental Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Deborah Gross, DNSc, FAAN, Professor; Wrenetha Julion, DNSc, RN, MPH, Assistant Professor; Louis Fogg, PhD, Assistant Professor
Parent training (PT) is a widely used intervention that has been particularly effective with middle-income European-American samples. Less impressive PT effects have been found with low-income families of color. One reason for these smaller effects may be that historically, PT programs have not been geared toward the interests and needs of low-income ethnic minority families raising their children in urban contexts. The purpose of this study is to develop and test the effectiveness of a new PT program, The Chicago Parent Program, for parents of 2-4 year olds enrolled in day care centers serving low-income families (97% ethnic minority). Building on the strengths of a well-tested program developed by Webster-Stratton, The Chicago Parent Program uses a 12-week video-based/group discussion format that was designed in collaboration with a parent advisory board. Real families were cast from Chicago neighborhoods and videotaped in a variety of situations including mealtimes, bedtimes, play, reading, children misbehaving in public and at home, parents under stress, grocery shopping with uncooperative children, managing bored children in a laundromat, sibling rivalry, and adults problem-solving about money, child visitation, and discipline disagreements. Videotaped scenes (n=120) are shown in the context of weekly parent groups by trained group leader who use these scenes and a standardized manual to focus discussion and stimulate problem-solving. The effectiveness of the program will be evaluated using an experimental design. Seven day care centers serving low-income families of 2-4 year olds (n=150 per condition) were randomly assigned to PT intervention or waiting-list control conditions. Dependent variables (parenting self-efficacy, parent and teacher-reported child behavior problems, discipline strategies, stress, neighborhood problems, observed child and parent behavior) will be assessed at baseline, post-intervention and at 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Data will be analyzed using growth curve modeling.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program: A Video-based Intervention for Families of Coloren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of The Chicago Parent Program: A Video-based Intervention for Families of Color</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garvey, Christine, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community and Mental Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Gross, DNSc, FAAN, Professor; Wrenetha Julion, DNSc, RN, MPH, Assistant Professor; Louis Fogg, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Parent training (PT) is a widely used intervention that has been particularly effective with middle-income European-American samples. Less impressive PT effects have been found with low-income families of color. One reason for these smaller effects may be that historically, PT programs have not been geared toward the interests and needs of low-income ethnic minority families raising their children in urban contexts. The purpose of this study is to develop and test the effectiveness of a new PT program, The Chicago Parent Program, for parents of 2-4 year olds enrolled in day care centers serving low-income families (97% ethnic minority). Building on the strengths of a well-tested program developed by Webster-Stratton, The Chicago Parent Program uses a 12-week video-based/group discussion format that was designed in collaboration with a parent advisory board. Real families were cast from Chicago neighborhoods and videotaped in a variety of situations including mealtimes, bedtimes, play, reading, children misbehaving in public and at home, parents under stress, grocery shopping with uncooperative children, managing bored children in a laundromat, sibling rivalry, and adults problem-solving about money, child visitation, and discipline disagreements. Videotaped scenes (n=120) are shown in the context of weekly parent groups by trained group leader who use these scenes and a standardized manual to focus discussion and stimulate problem-solving. The effectiveness of the program will be evaluated using an experimental design. Seven day care centers serving low-income families of 2-4 year olds (n=150 per condition) were randomly assigned to PT intervention or waiting-list control conditions. Dependent variables (parenting self-efficacy, parent and teacher-reported child behavior problems, discipline strategies, stress, neighborhood problems, observed child and parent behavior) will be assessed at baseline, post-intervention and at 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Data will be analyzed using growth curve modeling.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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