Is there a difference in perceptions of the safety culture between nurses and other healthcare professionals?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158677
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is there a difference in perceptions of the safety culture between nurses and other healthcare professionals?
Abstract:
Is there a difference in perceptions of the safety culture between nurses and other healthcare professionals?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hamaideh, Shaher
Contact Address:SON, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Co-Authors:Carol Deets, EdD, RN, Associate Dean
The purpose of this study was to compare safety culture perceptions to determine if there were differences between those of nurses and other healthcare professionals (HCprof). This study was part of an on-going project for the VA Midwest Patient Safety Center of Inquiry that addressed issues concerning healthcare organizations’ safety culture. Perceptions of the Safety Culture in healthcare facilities include improving the performance of healthcare delivery and, in particular, the coordination of multiple complex systems. Nurses are the usual persons who coordinate these interacting, complex systems for their patients, whereas the HCprof are not exposed to as much complexity. Thus, the hypothesis was that HCprof have significantly more positive perceptions of the safety culture than nurses have. Data were collected from a large metropolitan hospital. The sample consisted of 267 nurses and 208 HCprof (therapists, pharmacists, social workers and others). An instrument with four scales was used to measure four dimensions of safety culture (Positive atmosphere, Time/resources, Openness and Learning). The instrument demonstrated acceptable levels of reliability with Cronbach’s alpha ranging from .60 to .90. Significant differences were found between the two groups. HCprof had more positive perceptions of Positive atmosphere, Time/resources and Openness than nurses had. Nurses had more positive perceptions of Learning related to safety than the other HCprof had. Two possible explanations are: 1) Results were influenced by the diversity of HCprof thus an ANOVA was computed across the four types of professionals. No differences were found on three of the four scales. 2) Nurses interact with many more parts of the complex health system than do the HCprof making them more vulnerable to safety concerns. Although the hypothesis was supported, these findings are troubling since nurses believe they have the more positive perception of safety. More research in this area is clearly needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs there a difference in perceptions of the safety culture between nurses and other healthcare professionals?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158677-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is there a difference in perceptions of the safety culture between nurses and other healthcare professionals?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamaideh, Shaher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Deets, EdD, RN, Associate Dean </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to compare safety culture perceptions to determine if there were differences between those of nurses and other healthcare professionals (HCprof). This study was part of an on-going project for the VA Midwest Patient Safety Center of Inquiry that addressed issues concerning healthcare organizations&rsquo; safety culture. Perceptions of the Safety Culture in healthcare facilities include improving the performance of healthcare delivery and, in particular, the coordination of multiple complex systems. Nurses are the usual persons who coordinate these interacting, complex systems for their patients, whereas the HCprof are not exposed to as much complexity. Thus, the hypothesis was that HCprof have significantly more positive perceptions of the safety culture than nurses have. Data were collected from a large metropolitan hospital. The sample consisted of 267 nurses and 208 HCprof (therapists, pharmacists, social workers and others). An instrument with four scales was used to measure four dimensions of safety culture (Positive atmosphere, Time/resources, Openness and Learning). The instrument demonstrated acceptable levels of reliability with Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha ranging from .60 to .90. Significant differences were found between the two groups. HCprof had more positive perceptions of Positive atmosphere, Time/resources and Openness than nurses had. Nurses had more positive perceptions of Learning related to safety than the other HCprof had. Two possible explanations are: 1) Results were influenced by the diversity of HCprof thus an ANOVA was computed across the four types of professionals. No differences were found on three of the four scales. 2) Nurses interact with many more parts of the complex health system than do the HCprof making them more vulnerable to safety concerns. Although the hypothesis was supported, these findings are troubling since nurses believe they have the more positive perception of safety. More research in this area is clearly needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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