Decision Making and Self-Management Characteristics of Individuals with Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision Making and Self-Management Characteristics of Individuals with Heart Failure
Abstract:
Decision Making and Self-Management Characteristics of Individuals with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hicks, Frank, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing - AAC 1064B, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Penny F. Pierce, PhD, RN; Jan Shanahan, MSN, RN, ACNP; Karen Stimmer, MSN, RN, CS, ACNP
Self-management of heart failure (HF), an important factor in determining positive clinical outcomes, requires patients to actively participate in their care by maintaining and managing their condition. As such, self-management requires sound decision-making. Few investigators, however, have examined important personal decision characteristics and their relationship to HF self-management. The purpose of this study, which used a naturalistic decision making framework, was to describe the relationship of decision-making style and decision control preferences to HF self-management. Instruments included the Decision Control Preference Card Sort and the Michigan Assessment of Decision Style. Individuals were screened for presence of cognitive impairment with the mini-mental status examination. The sample consisted of 47 men and 15 women distributed across NYHA classes II-IV. Approximately 19% of the men scored < 24 on the mini-mental status examination, indicating some degree of cognitive impairment, and were significantly more cognitively impaired than women, especially in the area of recall (memory). Although there were no significant relationships among decision characteristics and self-management, there were pertinent findings suggestive of gender difference in decision-making characteristics and HF self-management. Women in this study were more likely to play active roles in self-management decision-making, were significantly more likely to ask questions when making self-management decisions, had significantly higher self-management maintenance scores than men, and asymptomatic females tended toward better self-care of their HF than their male counterparts. Implications for practice and research are presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision Making and Self-Management Characteristics of Individuals with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision Making and Self-Management Characteristics of Individuals with Heart Failure </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hicks, Frank, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing - AAC 1064B, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Penny F. Pierce, PhD, RN; Jan Shanahan, MSN, RN, ACNP; Karen Stimmer, MSN, RN, CS, ACNP </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-management of heart failure (HF), an important factor in determining positive clinical outcomes, requires patients to actively participate in their care by maintaining and managing their condition. As such, self-management requires sound decision-making. Few investigators, however, have examined important personal decision characteristics and their relationship to HF self-management. The purpose of this study, which used a naturalistic decision making framework, was to describe the relationship of decision-making style and decision control preferences to HF self-management. Instruments included the Decision Control Preference Card Sort and the Michigan Assessment of Decision Style. Individuals were screened for presence of cognitive impairment with the mini-mental status examination. The sample consisted of 47 men and 15 women distributed across NYHA classes II-IV. Approximately 19% of the men scored &lt; 24 on the mini-mental status examination, indicating some degree of cognitive impairment, and were significantly more cognitively impaired than women, especially in the area of recall (memory). Although there were no significant relationships among decision characteristics and self-management, there were pertinent findings suggestive of gender difference in decision-making characteristics and HF self-management. Women in this study were more likely to play active roles in self-management decision-making, were significantly more likely to ask questions when making self-management decisions, had significantly higher self-management maintenance scores than men, and asymptomatic females tended toward better self-care of their HF than their male counterparts. Implications for practice and research are presented. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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