Milk Volume in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Milk Volume in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery
Abstract:
Milk Volume in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hill, Pamela, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1515 5th Avenue,, Moline, IL, 61265, USA
Co-Authors:Jean C. Aldag, PhD, RN, Professor
Primary and secondary mediators with milk volume were examined during the first 6 weeks following delivery for a convenient sample of lactating mothers of term and preterm infants. The Hill & Aldag lactation model served as the foundation for this study. The primary mediators in this model include: previous breastfeeding experience, intent to breastfeed, support, maternal education, and income; secondary mediators include: initiation of breast stimulation, frequency of breast stimulation,and kangaroo care (mother-baby skin-to-skin contact). This longitudinal repeated measures design was conducted at four tertiary care centers in the state of Illinois. Mothers of term (n=98) and preterm (n=96) infants recorded the amount of mother’s milk in grams transferred from breast to the infant during each feeding using the BabyWeigh scale, or the amount of milk mechanically expressed in milliliters, respectively, the first 42 days after delivery. Spearman rho was used to test all correlations. Group differences over time were tested with R-MANOVA. Preterm mothers had significantly lower income, breastfeeding experience, proportion of whites, and living with dad. Milk volume from week to week was highly correlated as well as frequency of breast stimulation. Term mothers produced significantly more milk over the 6 weeks than preterm mothers. Preterm mothers’ early milk volume was correlated with early initiation of breast stimulation, infant gestational age, frequency of breast stimulation, and kangaroo care. Term mothers’ milk volume was correlated with when decision was made to breastfeed, prior breastfeeding experience, income, white, and frequency of breast stimulation. Preterm mothers’ frequency of breast stimulation was correlated with living with the father and white; term mothers’ frequency was correlated with intended weeks to breastfeed, white, and early initiation of lactation. Results suggest that early intervention prior to week 2 postpartum is important to enhance milk production. Also, preterm and term mothers of color and preterm mothers who do not live with the baby’s father are at higher risk for decreased frequency of breast stimulation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMilk Volume in Lactating Mothers of Term & Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Deliveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Milk Volume in Lactating Mothers of Term &amp; Very Preterm Infants during the First 6 Weeks Post Delivery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Pamela, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1515 5th Avenue,, Moline, IL, 61265, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean C. Aldag, PhD, RN, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Primary and secondary mediators with milk volume were examined during the first 6 weeks following delivery for a convenient sample of lactating mothers of term and preterm infants. The Hill &amp; Aldag lactation model served as the foundation for this study. The primary mediators in this model include: previous breastfeeding experience, intent to breastfeed, support, maternal education, and income; secondary mediators include: initiation of breast stimulation, frequency of breast stimulation,and kangaroo care (mother-baby skin-to-skin contact). This longitudinal repeated measures design was conducted at four tertiary care centers in the state of Illinois. Mothers of term (n=98) and preterm (n=96) infants recorded the amount of mother&rsquo;s milk in grams transferred from breast to the infant during each feeding using the BabyWeigh scale, or the amount of milk mechanically expressed in milliliters, respectively, the first 42 days after delivery. Spearman rho was used to test all correlations. Group differences over time were tested with R-MANOVA. Preterm mothers had significantly lower income, breastfeeding experience, proportion of whites, and living with dad. Milk volume from week to week was highly correlated as well as frequency of breast stimulation. Term mothers produced significantly more milk over the 6 weeks than preterm mothers. Preterm mothers&rsquo; early milk volume was correlated with early initiation of breast stimulation, infant gestational age, frequency of breast stimulation, and kangaroo care. Term mothers&rsquo; milk volume was correlated with when decision was made to breastfeed, prior breastfeeding experience, income, white, and frequency of breast stimulation. Preterm mothers&rsquo; frequency of breast stimulation was correlated with living with the father and white; term mothers&rsquo; frequency was correlated with intended weeks to breastfeed, white, and early initiation of lactation. Results suggest that early intervention prior to week 2 postpartum is important to enhance milk production. Also, preterm and term mothers of color and preterm mothers who do not live with the baby&rsquo;s father are at higher risk for decreased frequency of breast stimulation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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