2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158680
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supersize, Please!--Fighting Childhood Obesity through Early Intervention
Abstract:
Supersize, Please!--Fighting Childhood Obesity through Early Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Horodynski, Mildred, PhD, RNC
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:CON, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Co-Authors:Manfred Stommel, PhD, Associate Professor; Mary Jo Arndt, Gayle Coleman, MS, RD, Program Leader and Adjunct Faculty; Sharon Hoerr, PhD, RD, Professor; Dawn Contreras, PhD, Program Leader
Childhood obesity is a common health problem. Behaviors related to diet are established early in life. These behaviors are influenced by mothers’ nutritional knowledge and attitudes, which strongly relate to the quality of children’s dietary consumption. We examined low-income mothers’ knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and mealtime behavior regarding toddler nutrition before and after implementation of the Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers (NEAT) intervention. The NEAT intervention emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and behavioral skills for feeding toddlers and consists of: 1) four feeding and nutrition lessons, and 2) 18 weeks of structured reinforcement. Social cognitive theory guided the intervention. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal design was used with a sample of 125 Early Head Start families in 28 counties of Michigan. Toddlers ranged in age from 2-36 months (Mean: 19); mothers’ averaged 26 years of age (range: 17-45), many of whom did not work (65%), were not married (52%), had only high school education or less (65%), tended to be overweight (34%) or obese (32%), and suffered from depressive symptomatology (CESD score of 16+: 53.4%). Mothers completed the Child-Parent Mealtime Behavior Questionnaire, Facts on Feeding Children, Nutrition Attitudes, Feeding Self-Efficacy, and CES-D. One month after the NEAT lessons were taught, mothers’ knowledge of appropriate toddler feeding increased significantly (p<0.03), more in the intervention group (+1.3) than the control (+0.5). No other significant differences were found yet, but 18 weeks of structured reinforcement lessons and long-term follow-up (second phase) are not yet complete. Other results showed that most mothers in both groups had positive attitudes towards appropriate toddler feeding, expressed confidence in feeding their toddlers appropriately, but varied in their mealtime practices. These preliminary findings suggest that nutrition education for low-income caregivers can at least provide knowledge about feeding toddlers, especially correct portion sizes and the need to serve a new food many times.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupersize, Please!--Fighting Childhood Obesity through Early Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158680-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Supersize, Please!--Fighting Childhood Obesity through Early Intervention </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horodynski, Mildred, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Manfred Stommel, PhD, Associate Professor; Mary Jo Arndt, Gayle Coleman, MS, RD, Program Leader and Adjunct Faculty; Sharon Hoerr, PhD, RD, Professor; Dawn Contreras, PhD, Program Leader </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Childhood obesity is a common health problem. Behaviors related to diet are established early in life. These behaviors are influenced by mothers&rsquo; nutritional knowledge and attitudes, which strongly relate to the quality of children&rsquo;s dietary consumption. We examined low-income mothers&rsquo; knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and mealtime behavior regarding toddler nutrition before and after implementation of the Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers (NEAT) intervention. The NEAT intervention emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and behavioral skills for feeding toddlers and consists of: 1) four feeding and nutrition lessons, and 2) 18 weeks of structured reinforcement. Social cognitive theory guided the intervention. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal design was used with a sample of 125 Early Head Start families in 28 counties of Michigan. Toddlers ranged in age from 2-36 months (Mean: 19); mothers&rsquo; averaged 26 years of age (range: 17-45), many of whom did not work (65%), were not married (52%), had only high school education or less (65%), tended to be overweight (34%) or obese (32%), and suffered from depressive symptomatology (CESD score of 16+: 53.4%). Mothers completed the Child-Parent Mealtime Behavior Questionnaire, Facts on Feeding Children, Nutrition Attitudes, Feeding Self-Efficacy, and CES-D. One month after the NEAT lessons were taught, mothers&rsquo; knowledge of appropriate toddler feeding increased significantly (p&lt;0.03), more in the intervention group (+1.3) than the control (+0.5). No other significant differences were found yet, but 18 weeks of structured reinforcement lessons and long-term follow-up (second phase) are not yet complete. Other results showed that most mothers in both groups had positive attitudes towards appropriate toddler feeding, expressed confidence in feeding their toddlers appropriately, but varied in their mealtime practices. These preliminary findings suggest that nutrition education for low-income caregivers can at least provide knowledge about feeding toddlers, especially correct portion sizes and the need to serve a new food many times. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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