2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158681
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Deficit Symptoms and Physical Function in Chronic Heart Failure
Abstract:
Cognitive Deficit Symptoms and Physical Function in Chronic Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hou, Nan, MSN, RN
Contact Address:18224 28th Dr. SE, Bothell, WA, 98012, USA
Co-Authors:Susan J. Benett, DNS, RN; Cynthia D. Adams, MSN, RN, CS
Patients with heart failure (HF) report symptoms of cognitive deficits as problems that may interfere with physical function and self-care. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive study were to: 1) describe the cognitive deficit symptoms among patients with HF compared to cognitive deficit symptoms among a group of age-matched healthy control participants; 2) examine the relationship among cognitive deficit symptoms, mental status, and physical function; and 3) categorize the self-care strategies used to manage cognitive deficit symptoms reported by HF patients. Sample: A convenience sample of 30 HF patients was recruited from outpatient clinics of a private cardiology practice in the Midwest. A sample of 10 healthy control participants was recruited from the HF patients’ spouses and other family members. Methods: The HF patients and healthy participants completed the Alertness Behavior Scale (ABS) of the Sickness Impact Profile, the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ), the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI), and open-ended questions about self-care strategies used to manage cognitive deficit symptoms by telephone interviews. Results: Patients with HF had significantly more cognitive deficit symptoms and poorer physical function scores than the healthy participants. No significant difference in mental status between two groups. Cognitive deficit symptoms, mental status, and physical function were not significantly correlated. The three most commonly reported cognitive deficit symptoms are having more minor accidents, forgetfulness, and reacting slowly. Patients with HF reported few strategies used to manage the cognitive deficit symptoms. Conclusions: In this sample, patients with HF had more cognitive deficit symptoms and poorer physical function than healthy participants, and the patients reported few management strategies. The ways in which these symptoms affect self care need to be evaluated in a larger sample of HF patients in order to develop effective interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Deficit Symptoms and Physical Function in Chronic Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158681-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Deficit Symptoms and Physical Function in Chronic Heart Failure </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hou, Nan, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">18224 28th Dr. SE, Bothell, WA, 98012, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan J. Benett, DNS, RN; Cynthia D. Adams, MSN, RN, CS </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patients with heart failure (HF) report symptoms of cognitive deficits as problems that may interfere with physical function and self-care. Purpose: The purposes of this descriptive study were to: 1) describe the cognitive deficit symptoms among patients with HF compared to cognitive deficit symptoms among a group of age-matched healthy control participants; 2) examine the relationship among cognitive deficit symptoms, mental status, and physical function; and 3) categorize the self-care strategies used to manage cognitive deficit symptoms reported by HF patients. Sample: A convenience sample of 30 HF patients was recruited from outpatient clinics of a private cardiology practice in the Midwest. A sample of 10 healthy control participants was recruited from the HF patients&rsquo; spouses and other family members. Methods: The HF patients and healthy participants completed the Alertness Behavior Scale (ABS) of the Sickness Impact Profile, the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ), the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI), and open-ended questions about self-care strategies used to manage cognitive deficit symptoms by telephone interviews. Results: Patients with HF had significantly more cognitive deficit symptoms and poorer physical function scores than the healthy participants. No significant difference in mental status between two groups. Cognitive deficit symptoms, mental status, and physical function were not significantly correlated. The three most commonly reported cognitive deficit symptoms are having more minor accidents, forgetfulness, and reacting slowly. Patients with HF reported few strategies used to manage the cognitive deficit symptoms. Conclusions: In this sample, patients with HF had more cognitive deficit symptoms and poorer physical function than healthy participants, and the patients reported few management strategies. The ways in which these symptoms affect self care need to be evaluated in a larger sample of HF patients in order to develop effective interventions. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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