2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158682
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of Psychometric Properties of the Postoperative Activity Scale
Abstract:
Development of Psychometric Properties of the Postoperative Activity Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Huang, Shih-Tzu, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Xiaomei Cong, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Yaewon Seo, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
The purpose was to report the psychometric properties of the postoperative activity scale (PAS) to quantify the amount of activity in patients after major abdominal surgery. Measuring postoperative activity may contribute to a theory of activity in relation to recovery (Redeker & Wykpisz, 1999). The PAS measures the intensity, duration and frequency of six ranked postoperative activities according to distance (.5–5): dangling, and walking: to chair, in room, to bathroom, in hall (short) and in hall (long). Patients (N=238) reported their activities in terms of distance and frequency four times daily. Scoring was by multiplying the distance by the frequency, and summing at each time point (possible=0 - 46.5). The sample was aged M=48±11 years, 78% female, 63% white, and 68% with some college. Using repeated measures ANOVA, criteria-related validity of PAS was supported by significant increases in means Day 8am M (SD) 12noon M (SD) 4pm M (SD) 8pm M (SD) 1 1.23 (2.16) 4.17 (4.29) 9.31 (7.74) 9.59 (8.33) 2 10.49 (8.23) 10.21 (7.47) 16.85 (9.60) 15.18 (9.25) across each day, and from day 1 to day 2, p< .001. Further support was found in correlations showing that patients with more activity had less pain, r=.15 to .26, were younger, r=.15 to .28, and had shorter surgery, r=.20 to .29. Test-retest reliability was supported by significant positive correlations on both days, r=.48 to .65, that were stronger at adjacent points. Postoperative activity would be expected to increase by time, thus supporting the reliability of the PAS. The PAS can be used by nursing researchers to study relationships between postoperative activity, pain, sleep, immune factors, and recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of Psychometric Properties of the Postoperative Activity Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158682-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of Psychometric Properties of the Postoperative Activity Scale </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Shih-Tzu, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Xiaomei Cong, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Yaewon Seo, PhD(c), MSN, RN; Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose was to report the psychometric properties of the postoperative activity scale (PAS) to quantify the amount of activity in patients after major abdominal surgery. Measuring postoperative activity may contribute to a theory of activity in relation to recovery (Redeker &amp; Wykpisz, 1999). The PAS measures the intensity, duration and frequency of six ranked postoperative activities according to distance (.5&ndash;5): dangling, and walking: to chair, in room, to bathroom, in hall (short) and in hall (long). Patients (N=238) reported their activities in terms of distance and frequency four times daily. Scoring was by multiplying the distance by the frequency, and summing at each time point (possible=0 - 46.5). The sample was aged M=48&plusmn;11 years, 78% female, 63% white, and 68% with some college. Using repeated measures ANOVA, criteria-related validity of PAS was supported by significant increases in means Day 8am M (SD) 12noon M (SD) 4pm M (SD) 8pm M (SD) 1 1.23 (2.16) 4.17 (4.29) 9.31 (7.74) 9.59 (8.33) 2 10.49 (8.23) 10.21 (7.47) 16.85 (9.60) 15.18 (9.25) across each day, and from day 1 to day 2, p&lt; .001. Further support was found in correlations showing that patients with more activity had less pain, r=.15 to .26, were younger, r=.15 to .28, and had shorter surgery, r=.20 to .29. Test-retest reliability was supported by significant positive correlations on both days, r=.48 to .65, that were stronger at adjacent points. Postoperative activity would be expected to increase by time, thus supporting the reliability of the PAS. The PAS can be used by nursing researchers to study relationships between postoperative activity, pain, sleep, immune factors, and recovery. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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