Effect of Impaired Cognition on Hypertension Outcomes in Older Urban African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158687
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Impaired Cognition on Hypertension Outcomes in Older Urban African Americans
Abstract:
Effect of Impaired Cognition on Hypertension Outcomes in Older Urban African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Klymko, Kay , MSN, APRN, BC, FNP
Contact Address:CON, 3239 Turnberry Ln, Port Huron, MI, 48060, USA
Co-Authors:Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Peter A. Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Director, Institute of Gerontology; Olivia G. M. Washington, Associate Professor
Hypertension prevention strategies may depend on an individual’s cognitive ability to perform self-care. While evidence is present to support that aging and hypertension result in risk for cognitive decline, there have been few, if any, studies of cognitive decline in African American elders. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe cognitive function in a sample of hypertensive older African American men and women, 2) examine the relationship between cognitive function and compliance with therapeutic regimens, and 3) examine the relationship between baseline cognitive function and blood pressure Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Sternberg’s Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence guided the selection of cognitive domains for study and choice of measurement tools. Subjects: Using a descriptive correlational design, 40 participants were recruited from a larger clinical trial to test the effects of a telemonitoring intervention. Method: Cognitive status was measured utilizing the Fuld Object-Memory Evaluation (FOME) and the MacNeil-Lichtenburg Decision Tree (MLDT). Results: Participants <80 years had mean scores on the FOME indices for storage and retrieval almost identical to the original normative sample by Fuld. Using one standard deviation as the cut-off score from Fuld’s normative values, 25 percent of the 60-79 year group (n=9) responses were consistent with a least one categorical deficit in storage or retrieval. The MLDT supported similar deficits. In progress, is further analysis of variables utilizing: a) blood pressure: digital monitor by Omron (Intellisense #747), b) dietary: food recalls using computer software entitled the Food Processor by ESHA Research, c) physical activity: 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) Interview, and d) antihypertension medication use: electronic monitoring system, the eDEM Electronic Drug Exposure Monitor by AARDEX Ltd., New York, NY. Conclusions: Current findings support the importance in community based hypertension programs of awareness that older participants may experience cognitive deficits requiring compensatory interventions
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Impaired Cognition on Hypertension Outcomes in Older Urban African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158687-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Impaired Cognition on Hypertension Outcomes in Older Urban African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Klymko, Kay , MSN, APRN, BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 3239 Turnberry Ln, Port Huron, MI, 48060, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Peter A. Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Director, Institute of Gerontology; Olivia G. M. Washington, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hypertension prevention strategies may depend on an individual&rsquo;s cognitive ability to perform self-care. While evidence is present to support that aging and hypertension result in risk for cognitive decline, there have been few, if any, studies of cognitive decline in African American elders. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe cognitive function in a sample of hypertensive older African American men and women, 2) examine the relationship between cognitive function and compliance with therapeutic regimens, and 3) examine the relationship between baseline cognitive function and blood pressure Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Sternberg&rsquo;s Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence guided the selection of cognitive domains for study and choice of measurement tools. Subjects: Using a descriptive correlational design, 40 participants were recruited from a larger clinical trial to test the effects of a telemonitoring intervention. Method: Cognitive status was measured utilizing the Fuld Object-Memory Evaluation (FOME) and the MacNeil-Lichtenburg Decision Tree (MLDT). Results: Participants &lt;80 years had mean scores on the FOME indices for storage and retrieval almost identical to the original normative sample by Fuld. Using one standard deviation as the cut-off score from Fuld&rsquo;s normative values, 25 percent of the 60-79 year group (n=9) responses were consistent with a least one categorical deficit in storage or retrieval. The MLDT supported similar deficits. In progress, is further analysis of variables utilizing: a) blood pressure: digital monitor by Omron (Intellisense #747), b) dietary: food recalls using computer software entitled the Food Processor by ESHA Research, c) physical activity: 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) Interview, and d) antihypertension medication use: electronic monitoring system, the eDEM Electronic Drug Exposure Monitor by AARDEX Ltd., New York, NY. Conclusions: Current findings support the importance in community based hypertension programs of awareness that older participants may experience cognitive deficits requiring compensatory interventions </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:17:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:17:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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