2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158688
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Black Hole for Babies and Moms
Abstract:
A Black Hole for Babies and Moms
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Krolikowski, Mary, MSN, RN
Contact Address:CON, 4418 N. 42 St, Milwaukee, WI, 53209, USA
Co-Authors:Teresa S. Johnson, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor
A Black Hole for Babies and Moms A study of nurses’ narratives about their home visits to families during the early postpartum period poses considerations concerning serious gaps in health care during that period. While other studies about the early postpartum period have focused on morbidity, this qualitative study has approached the topic using the definition of nursing in Nursing’s Social Policy Statement 2003 (ANA, 2003), as prevention and alleviation of suffering, and promotion of health. Analysis of the data was performed using a continual comparative process. Portions were hand coded to determine emerging categories, then the qualitative computer program N-Vivo was employed. Three researchers met regularly to define concepts and compare differing interpretations. Emerging concepts were compared to relevant literature throughout the process. Roy’s adaptation model provided the theoretical framework. Although society’s image of the postpartum period is of serenity and joy, and women are assumed immediately capable of providing adequate care to themselves and their infants, these nurses’ narratives described families’ physical and emotional suffering. One strong emerging theme involved barriers to achievement of maternal confidence and role adaptation. Another involved restoration needs of the dyad, such as nutrition and rest. Barriers included lack of knowledge or strategies regarding needs, and lack of connection to supportive resources, both family and professional. The narratives clearly demonstrated nursing interventions that served to alleviate suffering, meet immediate and continuing needs, and steer families toward adaptation. Further research must document, quantify, and demonstrate to funders, policy makers, and health care professionals the effectiveness of continued nursing care in the home after the delivery of an infant. As in other developed countries, families in our communities deserve postpartum home nursing care to facilitate the process of restoration and transition to a role of confidently providing care for themselves and their infants
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Black Hole for Babies and Momsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158688-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Black Hole for Babies and Moms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krolikowski, Mary, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 4418 N. 42 St, Milwaukee, WI, 53209, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa S. Johnson, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A Black Hole for Babies and Moms A study of nurses&rsquo; narratives about their home visits to families during the early postpartum period poses considerations concerning serious gaps in health care during that period. While other studies about the early postpartum period have focused on morbidity, this qualitative study has approached the topic using the definition of nursing in Nursing&rsquo;s Social Policy Statement 2003 (ANA, 2003), as prevention and alleviation of suffering, and promotion of health. Analysis of the data was performed using a continual comparative process. Portions were hand coded to determine emerging categories, then the qualitative computer program N-Vivo was employed. Three researchers met regularly to define concepts and compare differing interpretations. Emerging concepts were compared to relevant literature throughout the process. Roy&rsquo;s adaptation model provided the theoretical framework. Although society&rsquo;s image of the postpartum period is of serenity and joy, and women are assumed immediately capable of providing adequate care to themselves and their infants, these nurses&rsquo; narratives described families&rsquo; physical and emotional suffering. One strong emerging theme involved barriers to achievement of maternal confidence and role adaptation. Another involved restoration needs of the dyad, such as nutrition and rest. Barriers included lack of knowledge or strategies regarding needs, and lack of connection to supportive resources, both family and professional. The narratives clearly demonstrated nursing interventions that served to alleviate suffering, meet immediate and continuing needs, and steer families toward adaptation. Further research must document, quantify, and demonstrate to funders, policy makers, and health care professionals the effectiveness of continued nursing care in the home after the delivery of an infant. As in other developed countries, families in our communities deserve postpartum home nursing care to facilitate the process of restoration and transition to a role of confidently providing care for themselves and their infants</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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