2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158689
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Behavioral Responses to Lipopolysaccharide in Brown-Norway Rats
Abstract:
Behavioral Responses to Lipopolysaccharide in Brown-Norway Rats
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kupferschmid, Barbara, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, PhD Office Room 1305, 00 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482 , USA
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Evidence exists that sickness behaviors (weight loss, decreased food intake, and decreased motor activity and social exploration) result when animals are administered Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant cytokines, such as Interleukin 1ß (IL-1ß). However, the effects of LPS on spatial learning and other types of exploration have not been fully studied. In this study we examined the effect of LPS on spatial learning, motor activity, and exploration. Adult (5-6 months) and old (22 months) male Brown-Norway rats were randomly assigned to either the control or experimental groups. Mini Mitters, to continuously assess temperature and motor activity, were implanted in all animals. Following a recovery period, animals received intraperitoneal injections of either 250 µg/kg LPS or saline 3 hours after lights off. Based on fever peaks, young animals were assessed in the Morris-Water Maze (MWM) one hour after injections and old animals five hours after injections. Animals were given four trials per day for six days, a seven-day rest, and then 2 days of testing to assess retention. Directional heading error (DHE) and the time in seconds to reach a hidden platform were recorded for each trial. Average DHE and swim times were recorded daily. There was a significant interaction between the within-subject factor of time and the between-subject factor of age group when considering DHE (Lamda(5,23)=2.748, p <0.05), where older rats improved their performance over the first three test days and then leveled off while younger rats improved their DHE over the subsequent days. Over time, all animals receiving LPS had significantly poorer directional heading than controls (F(1,32)=6.540, p <0.05). These results suggest that LPS may be able to affect spatial learning following acute activation of the immune system. Supported by: NIH, NINR, grant #5 R29 NR04132
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBehavioral Responses to Lipopolysaccharide in Brown-Norway Ratsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158689-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Behavioral Responses to Lipopolysaccharide in Brown-Norway Rats </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kupferschmid, Barbara, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, PhD Office Room 1305, 00 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence exists that sickness behaviors (weight loss, decreased food intake, and decreased motor activity and social exploration) result when animals are administered Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or recombinant cytokines, such as Interleukin 1&szlig; (IL-1&szlig;). However, the effects of LPS on spatial learning and other types of exploration have not been fully studied. In this study we examined the effect of LPS on spatial learning, motor activity, and exploration. Adult (5-6 months) and old (22 months) male Brown-Norway rats were randomly assigned to either the control or experimental groups. Mini Mitters, to continuously assess temperature and motor activity, were implanted in all animals. Following a recovery period, animals received intraperitoneal injections of either 250 &micro;g/kg LPS or saline 3 hours after lights off. Based on fever peaks, young animals were assessed in the Morris-Water Maze (MWM) one hour after injections and old animals five hours after injections. Animals were given four trials per day for six days, a seven-day rest, and then 2 days of testing to assess retention. Directional heading error (DHE) and the time in seconds to reach a hidden platform were recorded for each trial. Average DHE and swim times were recorded daily. There was a significant interaction between the within-subject factor of time and the between-subject factor of age group when considering DHE (Lamda(5,23)=2.748, p &lt;0.05), where older rats improved their performance over the first three test days and then leveled off while younger rats improved their DHE over the subsequent days. Over time, all animals receiving LPS had significantly poorer directional heading than controls (F(1,32)=6.540, p &lt;0.05). These results suggest that LPS may be able to affect spatial learning following acute activation of the immune system. Supported by: NIH, NINR, grant #5 R29 NR04132</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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