Hot flashes and other Perimenopause-Associated Symptoms before and after an Exercise Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158692
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot flashes and other Perimenopause-Associated Symptoms before and after an Exercise Program
Abstract:
Hot flashes and other Perimenopause-Associated Symptoms before and after an Exercise Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Li, Suling, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Jaimie Lehotsky, BS, Exercise Physiologist; Karyn Holm, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing; Michael J. Zinaman, MD, Associate Professor
Approximately 50-85% of perimenopausal women experience hot flashes and other perimenopause-associated symptoms including psychosomatic and sexual; many use nonpharmacological means to manage these symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on frequency of hot flashes (mild, moderate, and severe) and other perimenoapuse associated symptoms (psychosomatic and sexual) in symptomatic, sedentary perimenopausal women with and without hormone therapy (HT). A total of 30 perimenopausal women aged 45 to 55 yrs (mean=49.9; SD=3.2) reporting moderate to severe or daily hot flashes at baseline were randomly assigned to the exercise (n=14) or the non-exercise (n=16) group. The exercise intervention was a 12-week, one-hour/per session, three times/week, individualized, facility-based program consisting of both aerobic and resistance exercise training directed by a personal trainer. The primary outcome measure was change in frequency of mild, moderate and severe hot flashes measured by a 7-day hot flashes diary and other perimenopause-associated symptoms (psychosomatic and sexual), assessed by a modified Women’s Health Assessment Scale between baseline and 12 weeks. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) levels were measured at baseline. Other measures included a questionnaire about demographic factors and reproductive history, fitness testing, and body scans. We found that the exercise group reported reductions in the number of moderate and severe hot flashes, while the non-exercise group reported slight increases in these symptoms. The exercise group also reported improvement in psychosomatic symptoms while the non-exercise group reported little change in these symptoms. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The changes in mild hot flashes and sexual symptoms between baseline and 12 weeks were similar for the exercise and the non-exercise groups. In conclusion, these data suggest that exercise may improve moderate to severe hot flashes and psychosomatic symptoms. However, further studies with sufficient statistical power are warranted to validate the efficacy of exercise in ameliorating hot flashes and other perimenopause associated symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot flashes and other Perimenopause-Associated Symptoms before and after an Exercise Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158692-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hot flashes and other Perimenopause-Associated Symptoms before and after an Exercise Program </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Li, Suling, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaimie Lehotsky, BS, Exercise Physiologist; Karyn Holm, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing; Michael J. Zinaman, MD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 50-85% of perimenopausal women experience hot flashes and other perimenopause-associated symptoms including psychosomatic and sexual; many use nonpharmacological means to manage these symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on frequency of hot flashes (mild, moderate, and severe) and other perimenoapuse associated symptoms (psychosomatic and sexual) in symptomatic, sedentary perimenopausal women with and without hormone therapy (HT). A total of 30 perimenopausal women aged 45 to 55 yrs (mean=49.9; SD=3.2) reporting moderate to severe or daily hot flashes at baseline were randomly assigned to the exercise (n=14) or the non-exercise (n=16) group. The exercise intervention was a 12-week, one-hour/per session, three times/week, individualized, facility-based program consisting of both aerobic and resistance exercise training directed by a personal trainer. The primary outcome measure was change in frequency of mild, moderate and severe hot flashes measured by a 7-day hot flashes diary and other perimenopause-associated symptoms (psychosomatic and sexual), assessed by a modified Women&rsquo;s Health Assessment Scale between baseline and 12 weeks. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) levels were measured at baseline. Other measures included a questionnaire about demographic factors and reproductive history, fitness testing, and body scans. We found that the exercise group reported reductions in the number of moderate and severe hot flashes, while the non-exercise group reported slight increases in these symptoms. The exercise group also reported improvement in psychosomatic symptoms while the non-exercise group reported little change in these symptoms. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The changes in mild hot flashes and sexual symptoms between baseline and 12 weeks were similar for the exercise and the non-exercise groups. In conclusion, these data suggest that exercise may improve moderate to severe hot flashes and psychosomatic symptoms. However, further studies with sufficient statistical power are warranted to validate the efficacy of exercise in ameliorating hot flashes and other perimenopause associated symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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