2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158693
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment Issues in Internet Cancer Support Groups
Abstract:
Recruitment Issues in Internet Cancer Support Groups
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lin, Li, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Co-Authors:Hsiu-min Tsai, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Ching-Yu Cheng, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Wonshik Chee, PhD, Assistant Professor; Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN, CNS, Associate Professor
The Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) provide an excellent setting to recruit research participants. Yet, very little is known about issues in recruitment through the ICSGs. The purpose of this presentation is to describe issues in recruitment through the ICSGs based on an empirical study. A feminist approach was used to guide this analysis. A total of 803 websites for the ICSGs were retrieved through an Internet search process using several Internet search engines. Among them, 162 were eligible ICSGs websites, which were actually providing online supports for cancer patients. The eligible websites were determined based upon the target population, purpose of the website, and number of members. The web masters and/or list owners of the eligible websites were contacted and their willingness to announce the study was asked. Only 9 of them agreed to announce the study (7 by yahoo.com, one by msn.com, none by accor.org, and one by google.com). During the recruitment process, issues raised in using the ICSGs for recruitment were discussed, and memos about the issues were written. Then, the written memos were analyzed using the content analysis by Weber. The following issues emerged from the analysis process. In terms of intersubjectivity, the ICSGs had several problems (e.g., 81 % of the websites were not user friendly and it was difficult to find useful information in 67% of them). In terms of credibility, there was a concern because authenticity of the websites could not be easily ensured. Finally, reflectivity and adequacy were also issues to consider because there were virtually no policies or standards for the websites of the ICSGs. A web owner could design a perfect, good-looking website, but she/he might present incorrect information. Based on the findings, implications for future use of the ICSGs for recruitment of research participants will be proposed. Acknowledgments This analysis was conducted as a part of the study funded by the National Institute of Health (1 R01 NR007900-01A1).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment Issues in Internet Cancer Support Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158693-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment Issues in Internet Cancer Support Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lin, Li, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hsiu-min Tsai, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Ching-Yu Cheng, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Wonshik Chee, PhD, Assistant Professor; Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN, CNS, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) provide an excellent setting to recruit research participants. Yet, very little is known about issues in recruitment through the ICSGs. The purpose of this presentation is to describe issues in recruitment through the ICSGs based on an empirical study. A feminist approach was used to guide this analysis. A total of 803 websites for the ICSGs were retrieved through an Internet search process using several Internet search engines. Among them, 162 were eligible ICSGs websites, which were actually providing online supports for cancer patients. The eligible websites were determined based upon the target population, purpose of the website, and number of members. The web masters and/or list owners of the eligible websites were contacted and their willingness to announce the study was asked. Only 9 of them agreed to announce the study (7 by yahoo.com, one by msn.com, none by accor.org, and one by google.com). During the recruitment process, issues raised in using the ICSGs for recruitment were discussed, and memos about the issues were written. Then, the written memos were analyzed using the content analysis by Weber. The following issues emerged from the analysis process. In terms of intersubjectivity, the ICSGs had several problems (e.g., 81 % of the websites were not user friendly and it was difficult to find useful information in 67% of them). In terms of credibility, there was a concern because authenticity of the websites could not be easily ensured. Finally, reflectivity and adequacy were also issues to consider because there were virtually no policies or standards for the websites of the ICSGs. A web owner could design a perfect, good-looking website, but she/he might present incorrect information. Based on the findings, implications for future use of the ICSGs for recruitment of research participants will be proposed. Acknowledgments This analysis was conducted as a part of the study funded by the National Institute of Health (1 R01 NR007900-01A1). </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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