Differences in Lifestyle Exercise of African-American and Caucasian Cardiac Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158698
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences in Lifestyle Exercise of African-American and Caucasian Cardiac Patients
Abstract:
Differences in Lifestyle Exercise of African-American and Caucasian Cardiac Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Moore, Shirley, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Associate Professor and Research Dean
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA
Co-Authors:Jacqueline M. Charvat, BS, Project Manager; Beverly L. Roberts, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Mary A. Dolansky, PhD, RN, Post-doctoral Fellow
Consistent with models of social learning theory, understanding patterns of behavior in different populations is important to appropriately target interventions to enhance behavior change. Although the literature documents less lifestyle exercise among African Americans as compared to Caucasians, little is known about exercise following cardiac events in these two populations. The purpose of this study was to compare patterns of exercise over a 6-month period between African-American and Caucasian cardiac patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, a convenience sample of 123 people (46 women, 77 men; 98 Caucasians, 25 African-Americans) was followed for 6 months following cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Subjects were given heart rate monitors and instructed to wear them during exercise. Five exercise variables were measured: number of people exercising, exercise frequency, exercise amount (# hours exercised), duration of exercise sessions, and intensity (# hours exercised in target heart rate zone). Overall, 17% of the participants did no exercise following CR (African Americans=32%; Caucasians=13%). The percentage of African-Americans who did no exercise increased from 36% in Month 1 to 60% in Month 6, whereas the number of Caucasians who did no exercise increased from 15% in Month 1 to 34% in Month 6. Exercise amount over the 6-month period was significantly less in African Americans as compared to Caucasians (25.4 vs. 44.1 hours, respectively; F=4.98, p=.03). Between Month 1 and Month 6, the mean number of exercise sessions per month of African Americans decreased from 8.1 to 3.3, while the mean number of sessions per month of Caucasians decreased from 10.5 to 7.6. There were no differences between the groups in the duration of exercise sessions or exercise intensity. These findings indicate that both African Americans and Caucasians are not exercising at recommended levels following cardiac events, and African Americans exercise less than Caucasians.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences in Lifestyle Exercise of African-American and Caucasian Cardiac Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158698-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences in Lifestyle Exercise of African-American and Caucasian Cardiac Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Shirley, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Research Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacqueline M. Charvat, BS, Project Manager; Beverly L. Roberts, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Mary A. Dolansky, PhD, RN, Post-doctoral Fellow </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Consistent with models of social learning theory, understanding patterns of behavior in different populations is important to appropriately target interventions to enhance behavior change. Although the literature documents less lifestyle exercise among African Americans as compared to Caucasians, little is known about exercise following cardiac events in these two populations. The purpose of this study was to compare patterns of exercise over a 6-month period between African-American and Caucasian cardiac patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, a convenience sample of 123 people (46 women, 77 men; 98 Caucasians, 25 African-Americans) was followed for 6 months following cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Subjects were given heart rate monitors and instructed to wear them during exercise. Five exercise variables were measured: number of people exercising, exercise frequency, exercise amount (# hours exercised), duration of exercise sessions, and intensity (# hours exercised in target heart rate zone). Overall, 17% of the participants did no exercise following CR (African Americans=32%; Caucasians=13%). The percentage of African-Americans who did no exercise increased from 36% in Month 1 to 60% in Month 6, whereas the number of Caucasians who did no exercise increased from 15% in Month 1 to 34% in Month 6. Exercise amount over the 6-month period was significantly less in African Americans as compared to Caucasians (25.4 vs. 44.1 hours, respectively; F=4.98, p=.03). Between Month 1 and Month 6, the mean number of exercise sessions per month of African Americans decreased from 8.1 to 3.3, while the mean number of sessions per month of Caucasians decreased from 10.5 to 7.6. There were no differences between the groups in the duration of exercise sessions or exercise intensity. These findings indicate that both African Americans and Caucasians are not exercising at recommended levels following cardiac events, and African Americans exercise less than Caucasians. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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