2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158700
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relaxation and Music for Pain: Race and Cultural Preferences
Abstract:
Relaxation and Music for Pain: Race and Cultural Preferences
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland Oh, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5975
Co-Authors:M. Good, L. Chiang, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
The theory of a balance between analgesia and side effects proposes that nonpharmacological methods be used in addition to analgesics. Relaxation/music has been shown to reduce pain after surgery, but it is not known whether blacks and whites respond differently. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to determine whether there was an interaction between race and treatment group in a sample of blacks and whites in the Midwest and to describe their preferences. The primary RCT found that two-day postoperative use of relaxation/music (RM) reduced pain. The 388 participants (19-75 yrs) who were randomly assigned to receive RM included 116 (30%) blacks and 272 (70%) whites. Participants were offered their choice between six types of sedative music, synthesizer, harp, piano, orchestra, inspirational, and jazz. Effects of the taped intervention were measured with pain sensation and distress VAS scales before and after five 20-minutes tests of the interventions. Pretest-posttest difference scores were averaged and analyzed with ANOVA. Results showed that the relaxation/music group (n = 256), had significantly more pain relief than the control group, n = 125, p = .034, but there was no interaction with race. Interestingly, Chi-square analysis showed that there were significant differences in the types of music chosen, p < .001; the most frequently chosen type for blacks was jazz music (64%) and for whites it was orchestra music (34%). Nevertheless, the effect on pain did not differ based on race probably because participants chose from types of music thought to appeal to these two cultural groups. They listened to a little of each and chose sedative music that they thought would relax and distract them from pain after surgery. Nearly all (94-99%) liked or loved their chosen music. The types of music were similar in their sedative qualities, yet cultural influences and patients' personal preferences were important. It is recommended that for pain relief in addition to analgesics, nurses use taped relaxation plus slow calming music that their patients like, choosing from selections appropriate to their cultural background. Funded by National Institute of Nursing Research to Marion Good, RO1-NR3933; General Clinical Research Center, Case Western Reserve University.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelaxation and Music for Pain: Race and Cultural Preferencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158700-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relaxation and Music for Pain: Race and Cultural Preferences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland Oh, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpg@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Good, L. Chiang, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The theory of a balance between analgesia and side effects proposes that nonpharmacological methods be used in addition to analgesics. Relaxation/music has been shown to reduce pain after surgery, but it is not known whether blacks and whites respond differently. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to determine whether there was an interaction between race and treatment group in a sample of blacks and whites in the Midwest and to describe their preferences. The primary RCT found that two-day postoperative use of relaxation/music (RM) reduced pain. The 388 participants (19-75 yrs) who were randomly assigned to receive RM included 116 (30%) blacks and 272 (70%) whites. Participants were offered their choice between six types of sedative music, synthesizer, harp, piano, orchestra, inspirational, and jazz. Effects of the taped intervention were measured with pain sensation and distress VAS scales before and after five 20-minutes tests of the interventions. Pretest-posttest difference scores were averaged and analyzed with ANOVA. Results showed that the relaxation/music group (n = 256), had significantly more pain relief than the control group, n = 125, p = .034, but there was no interaction with race. Interestingly, Chi-square analysis showed that there were significant differences in the types of music chosen, p &lt; .001; the most frequently chosen type for blacks was jazz music (64%) and for whites it was orchestra music (34%). Nevertheless, the effect on pain did not differ based on race probably because participants chose from types of music thought to appeal to these two cultural groups. They listened to a little of each and chose sedative music that they thought would relax and distract them from pain after surgery. Nearly all (94-99%) liked or loved their chosen music. The types of music were similar in their sedative qualities, yet cultural influences and patients' personal preferences were important. It is recommended that for pain relief in addition to analgesics, nurses use taped relaxation plus slow calming music that their patients like, choosing from selections appropriate to their cultural background. Funded by National Institute of Nursing Research to Marion Good, RO1-NR3933; General Clinical Research Center, Case Western Reserve University.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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