2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Neurobiologic Regulation in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects
Abstract:
Early Neurobiologic Regulation in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Harrison, Tondi, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612.625.1497
Co-Authors:T.M. Harrison, Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Background: Infants with congenital heart defects (CHD) demonstrate impaired ability to regulate autonomically controlled physiologic processes, including feeding. Schore's theory of self-regulation suggests that the quality of interactions between mothers and infants affects physiologic regulation. Interactions between infants with CHD and their mothers are qualitatively different than interactions between healthy infants and their mothers. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare physiologic regulation and the effect of maternal sensitive caregiving during feeding on physiologic regulation in healthy infants and in infants with transposition of the great arteries (TGA), one of the most common CHDs. Methods: Fifteen infants with TGA were matched with 16 healthy infants on age, gender, and feeding type. Physiologic regulation was measured using high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV). The Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment was used to measure maternal sensitive caregiving. Data were collected post-operatively at two weeks and two months of age. Fixed occasions, multivariate regression analysis and event history analysis were the primary data analytic methods. Results: At two weeks, infants with TGA demonstrated lower HF HRV both before and after feeding, healthy infants were more likely than infants with TGA to demonstrate physiologically adaptive changes in HF HRV during feeding, and post-feeding recovery to pre-feeding HF HRV levels was similar between groups. Further, infants of more sensitive mothers had lower HF HRV during feeding, but this adaptive effect occurred only in healthy infants. By two months of age, most differences between groups were not apparent. Conclusions: For infants with TGA, effects of surgical recovery and limited contact with their mothers relative to healthy infants may have outweighed the supportive effect of maternal sensitivity during feeding in the early weeks of life. Further research is needed to identify ways of enhancing the regulatory effect of maternal behavior on infants with CHDs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Neurobiologic Regulation in Infants with Congenital Heart Defectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Early Neurobiologic Regulation in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Tondi, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612.625.1497</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">harr1179@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.M. Harrison, Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Infants with congenital heart defects (CHD) demonstrate impaired ability to regulate autonomically controlled physiologic processes, including feeding. Schore's theory of self-regulation suggests that the quality of interactions between mothers and infants affects physiologic regulation. Interactions between infants with CHD and their mothers are qualitatively different than interactions between healthy infants and their mothers. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare physiologic regulation and the effect of maternal sensitive caregiving during feeding on physiologic regulation in healthy infants and in infants with transposition of the great arteries (TGA), one of the most common CHDs. Methods: Fifteen infants with TGA were matched with 16 healthy infants on age, gender, and feeding type. Physiologic regulation was measured using high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV). The Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment was used to measure maternal sensitive caregiving. Data were collected post-operatively at two weeks and two months of age. Fixed occasions, multivariate regression analysis and event history analysis were the primary data analytic methods. Results: At two weeks, infants with TGA demonstrated lower HF HRV both before and after feeding, healthy infants were more likely than infants with TGA to demonstrate physiologically adaptive changes in HF HRV during feeding, and post-feeding recovery to pre-feeding HF HRV levels was similar between groups. Further, infants of more sensitive mothers had lower HF HRV during feeding, but this adaptive effect occurred only in healthy infants. By two months of age, most differences between groups were not apparent. Conclusions: For infants with TGA, effects of surgical recovery and limited contact with their mothers relative to healthy infants may have outweighed the supportive effect of maternal sensitivity during feeding in the early weeks of life. Further research is needed to identify ways of enhancing the regulatory effect of maternal behavior on infants with CHDs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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