2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158702
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prediction of Severe Postoperative Pain in Inpatient Populations
Abstract:
Prediction of Severe Postoperative Pain in Inpatient Populations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Herrick, Linda, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:300 University Square, 111 S. Broadway, Rochester, MN, USA
Contact Telephone:507-280-2825
Co-Authors:L.M. Herrick, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; L.M. Herrick, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN;
Purpose: Severe postoperative pain puts patients at high risk for complications and extended lengths of stay. The purpose of this study was to identify factors the influence severe postoperative pain in different surgical procedures. Framework: The conceptual framework consists of patient attributes, pre-operative status, surgical procedure, and post-operative interventions for pain with the outcome being pain severity. Methods: Data were collected prospectively on a cohort of patients (n = 997) undergoing select inpatient surgical procedures including abdominal, general, orthopedic and neurological surgeries. Variables collected included age, gender, pre-operative medication, type of surgery, incision location and size, pain ratings after surgery and medications for pain and anxiety postoperatively. Participants also completed a satisfaction survey prior to discharge. Main outcome measure: The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain of equal to or great than 8 using a verbal analogue scale. Results: Multivariate logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to determine a prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain included younger age, female, length of incision, and type of surgery. Pain interventions in a subpopulation varied during the study with a subgroup demonstrating that pharmacological interventions could prevent severe pain regardless of predictive variables. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that predictive variables are obtained pre-operatively and may be used to predict which patients may experience more severe pain immediately postoperatively. Identification of those patients who may be at high risk is important for nurses in order to be able to provide close assessment and appropriate pain interventions postoperatively in order to avoid high pain levels and associated complications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrediction of Severe Postoperative Pain in Inpatient Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158702-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prediction of Severe Postoperative Pain in Inpatient Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herrick, Linda, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">300 University Square, 111 S. Broadway, Rochester, MN, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-280-2825</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">herri028@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.M. Herrick, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; L.M. Herrick, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Severe postoperative pain puts patients at high risk for complications and extended lengths of stay. The purpose of this study was to identify factors the influence severe postoperative pain in different surgical procedures. Framework: The conceptual framework consists of patient attributes, pre-operative status, surgical procedure, and post-operative interventions for pain with the outcome being pain severity. Methods: Data were collected prospectively on a cohort of patients (n = 997) undergoing select inpatient surgical procedures including abdominal, general, orthopedic and neurological surgeries. Variables collected included age, gender, pre-operative medication, type of surgery, incision location and size, pain ratings after surgery and medications for pain and anxiety postoperatively. Participants also completed a satisfaction survey prior to discharge. Main outcome measure: The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain of equal to or great than 8 using a verbal analogue scale. Results: Multivariate logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to determine a prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain included younger age, female, length of incision, and type of surgery. Pain interventions in a subpopulation varied during the study with a subgroup demonstrating that pharmacological interventions could prevent severe pain regardless of predictive variables. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that predictive variables are obtained pre-operatively and may be used to predict which patients may experience more severe pain immediately postoperatively. Identification of those patients who may be at high risk is important for nurses in order to be able to provide close assessment and appropriate pain interventions postoperatively in order to avoid high pain levels and associated complications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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