2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158703
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decisional Influences on Home Care Referral
Abstract:
Decisional Influences on Home Care Referral
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hoover, Carrie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:College of St. Benedict/St. John's University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:37 S. College Avenue, St. Joseph, MN, 56374-2099, USA
Contact Telephone:320-333-7550
Co-Authors:C. Hoover, College of St.Benedict/St.John's University, St. Joseph, MN; S. Joyce, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; K. Greenlee, R. Wilson, M. Schimnich, J. Lilemoen, , St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN;
Transitional care research identifies factors associated with poor discharge planning, including frequent and costly hospital readmissions. Home care (HC) services have been shown to reduce health care utilization and costs. Often clinicians are able to correctly identify patients who do not need HC services, but are missing a significant number of patients who have a need for HC services. The process by which a clinician makes a decision regarding HC referrals has yet to be explored and may allow for targeted educational interventions to impact the process. This survey examined the decisional influences on clinicians who evaluate patients for HC referral during a hospital stay. Naturalistic decision making theory guided the adaptation of the Heart Failure Decisional Influences Inventory (HFDII). The HFDII measures the degree of influence sources have on individuals' decision making for HC referral. This 31-item questionnaire includes four categories: past experiences, assessment, feedback from the environment, and knowledge of available alternatives. A convenience sample taken from a Mid-Western hospital serving both rural and urban patients yielded a sample size of 296 participants (15% male; 60% age 51-60 years plus). Length of time in career was less than 5 years (28%) and 21 plus years (30%). Staff registered nurses comprised 78% of the sample, 13% physicians, and 9% social workers. The most important influences for referral were physical functioning, level of independence, and safety. The least influential factors were hospitalization within the last 6-months, language barrier, and perception of health. Physicians rated the following criteria lower in importance than nurses: hospitalization within the last 6-months; family expressed concern over self-care; and lives alone (p=.006; .002; .007, 95% CI). Education for clinicians on all risk factors associated with adverse, costly outcomes during transitional care such as hospitalization within the last 6-months, living alone, and perception of health is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecisional Influences on Home Care Referralen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158703-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decisional Influences on Home Care Referral</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoover, Carrie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of St. Benedict/St. John's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">37 S. College Avenue, St. Joseph, MN, 56374-2099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">320-333-7550</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">choover@csbsju.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Hoover, College of St.Benedict/St.John's University, St. Joseph, MN; S. Joyce, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; K. Greenlee, R. Wilson, M. Schimnich, J. Lilemoen, , St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Transitional care research identifies factors associated with poor discharge planning, including frequent and costly hospital readmissions. Home care (HC) services have been shown to reduce health care utilization and costs. Often clinicians are able to correctly identify patients who do not need HC services, but are missing a significant number of patients who have a need for HC services. The process by which a clinician makes a decision regarding HC referrals has yet to be explored and may allow for targeted educational interventions to impact the process. This survey examined the decisional influences on clinicians who evaluate patients for HC referral during a hospital stay. Naturalistic decision making theory guided the adaptation of the Heart Failure Decisional Influences Inventory (HFDII). The HFDII measures the degree of influence sources have on individuals' decision making for HC referral. This 31-item questionnaire includes four categories: past experiences, assessment, feedback from the environment, and knowledge of available alternatives. A convenience sample taken from a Mid-Western hospital serving both rural and urban patients yielded a sample size of 296 participants (15% male; 60% age 51-60 years plus). Length of time in career was less than 5 years (28%) and 21 plus years (30%). Staff registered nurses comprised 78% of the sample, 13% physicians, and 9% social workers. The most important influences for referral were physical functioning, level of independence, and safety. The least influential factors were hospitalization within the last 6-months, language barrier, and perception of health. Physicians rated the following criteria lower in importance than nurses: hospitalization within the last 6-months; family expressed concern over self-care; and lives alone (p=.006; .002; .007, 95% CI). Education for clinicians on all risk factors associated with adverse, costly outcomes during transitional care such as hospitalization within the last 6-months, living alone, and perception of health is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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