2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158704
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Thai and American Nurse Scholars Perspectives on Critical Thinking
Abstract:
Thai and American Nurse Scholars Perspectives on Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jenkins, Sheryl, PhD, ACNP
P.I. Institution Name:illinois State University
Title:nursing
Contact Address:22681 North 950 East Road, Carlock, IL, 61725, USA
Contact Telephone:309-242-6720
Co-Authors:S.D. Jenkins, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify those aspects of critical thinking in nursing that are (1) common to Thailand and the United States, (2) specific to Thailand and (3) specific to the United States. The culture common/culture specific framework (Triandis & Brislin, 1984) which guides this study is based on the premise that concepts do not have the same meanings across cultures. These differences are at the core of transcultural research. The primary goal of this study was to explore culture common and culture specific perspectives of critical thinking. Five nurse scholars from Thailand and five from the United States, all of whom had expertise in critical thinking, participated in in-depth, face to face interviews with the researcher to explore their perceptions of critical thinking. The participants described the following aspects of critical thinking in nursing: (1) impact of consensus definition, (2) teaching techniques, (3) essential components, (4) evaluation techniques, and (5) characteristics of critical thinking. Their statements were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. The emerging information was organized into themes which were then arranged to display commonalties and variances across the two cultures. The participants identified both culture common and culture specific facets in each of the five aspects of critical thinking. A cross-cultural comparison of the data revealed seven themes specific to Thai scholars, nine themes specific to American scholars, and thirty-eight themes common to nurse scholars in both cultures.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThai and American Nurse Scholars Perspectives on Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158704-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Thai and American Nurse Scholars Perspectives on Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jenkins, Sheryl, PhD, ACNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">22681 North 950 East Road, Carlock, IL, 61725, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-242-6720</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sjenkin@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.D. Jenkins, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify those aspects of critical thinking in nursing that are (1) common to Thailand and the United States, (2) specific to Thailand and (3) specific to the United States. The culture common/culture specific framework (Triandis &amp; Brislin, 1984) which guides this study is based on the premise that concepts do not have the same meanings across cultures. These differences are at the core of transcultural research. The primary goal of this study was to explore culture common and culture specific perspectives of critical thinking. Five nurse scholars from Thailand and five from the United States, all of whom had expertise in critical thinking, participated in in-depth, face to face interviews with the researcher to explore their perceptions of critical thinking. The participants described the following aspects of critical thinking in nursing: (1) impact of consensus definition, (2) teaching techniques, (3) essential components, (4) evaluation techniques, and (5) characteristics of critical thinking. Their statements were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. The emerging information was organized into themes which were then arranged to display commonalties and variances across the two cultures. The participants identified both culture common and culture specific facets in each of the five aspects of critical thinking. A cross-cultural comparison of the data revealed seven themes specific to Thai scholars, nine themes specific to American scholars, and thirty-eight themes common to nurse scholars in both cultures.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:18:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:18:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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