Japanese Translation and Cultural Adaptation of American Listening to Mothers-II Questionnaire

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Japanese Translation and Cultural Adaptation of American Listening to Mothers-II Questionnaire
Abstract:
Japanese Translation and Cultural Adaptation of American Listening to Mothers-II Questionnaire
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kishi, Rieko, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:533 S. Cuyler Ave. #2, Oak Park, IL, 60304, USA
Contact Telephone:708-383-1337
Co-Authors:R. Kishi, B.J. McElmurry, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Background. To date, there have been inadequate survey data on the impact of rapidly changing prenatal care in Japan from the perspective of lay women within their social and cultural contexts. Purpose. To document the pretesting process of Japanese translation and cultural-adaptation of the American "Listening to Mothers-II (LTM-II)" questionnaire. The use of a translated questionnaire to examine Japanese women's birth experience was explored. Methods/Subjects. The methods of the study included review of the literature, use of multiple professional expert panels in the U.S. and Japan, translation by bilingual committee, and two phases of cognitive interviews with 20 postpartum Japanese adult women. Content validity and equivalence of the translated questionnaire were assessed. The cognitive interviewing techniques included the Think-Aloud technique, probing questions, and debriefing. Theoretical framework. Overall steps followed the U.S. Census Language Translation Guidelines. Cognitive interview data were analyzed according to the four stages proposed by Tourangeau: question interpretation, memory retrieval, judgment formation, and response editing. Results. The number of problems effectively decreased as the translated questionnaire was revised five times. Most problems were found in the question interpretation stage of cognitive process, and about half of the interpretation problems were wordings/tone. Culture-specific concepts and poor items were culturally adapted to prevent ambiguous or erroneous interpretations in the future analysis. Women preferred an in-person interview to other modes of data collection. Conclusions. This study validated translation and cultural adaptation of the LTM-II questionnaire for Japanese women within two years after birth, in rural and urban environments, and with varied education and income levels. Alternative questions were prepared to capture Japanese women's experience and qualitative cross-cultural comparisons. The future dataset will be useful for professionals to develop evidence-based practices and improve health care services, for women to prepare better for perinatal events, and for policy makers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJapanese Translation and Cultural Adaptation of American Listening to Mothers-II Questionnaireen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Japanese Translation and Cultural Adaptation of American Listening to Mothers-II Questionnaire</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kishi, Rieko, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">533 S. Cuyler Ave. #2, Oak Park, IL, 60304, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-383-1337</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">riekokishi@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Kishi, B.J. McElmurry, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. To date, there have been inadequate survey data on the impact of rapidly changing prenatal care in Japan from the perspective of lay women within their social and cultural contexts. Purpose. To document the pretesting process of Japanese translation and cultural-adaptation of the American &quot;Listening to Mothers-II (LTM-II)&quot; questionnaire. The use of a translated questionnaire to examine Japanese women's birth experience was explored. Methods/Subjects. The methods of the study included review of the literature, use of multiple professional expert panels in the U.S. and Japan, translation by bilingual committee, and two phases of cognitive interviews with 20 postpartum Japanese adult women. Content validity and equivalence of the translated questionnaire were assessed. The cognitive interviewing techniques included the Think-Aloud technique, probing questions, and debriefing. Theoretical framework. Overall steps followed the U.S. Census Language Translation Guidelines. Cognitive interview data were analyzed according to the four stages proposed by Tourangeau: question interpretation, memory retrieval, judgment formation, and response editing. Results. The number of problems effectively decreased as the translated questionnaire was revised five times. Most problems were found in the question interpretation stage of cognitive process, and about half of the interpretation problems were wordings/tone. Culture-specific concepts and poor items were culturally adapted to prevent ambiguous or erroneous interpretations in the future analysis. Women preferred an in-person interview to other modes of data collection. Conclusions. This study validated translation and cultural adaptation of the LTM-II questionnaire for Japanese women within two years after birth, in rural and urban environments, and with varied education and income levels. Alternative questions were prepared to capture Japanese women's experience and qualitative cross-cultural comparisons. The future dataset will be useful for professionals to develop evidence-based practices and improve health care services, for women to prepare better for perinatal events, and for policy makers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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