Building Capacity for Nurse Educators and Students in Nursing Informatics Competencies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158709
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Capacity for Nurse Educators and Students in Nursing Informatics Competencies
Abstract:
Building Capacity for Nurse Educators and Students in Nursing Informatics Competencies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Kossman, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA
Contact Telephone:309 438-2553
Co-Authors:S. Kossman, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
Healthcare in the 21st century presents numerous challenges as practitioners strive to provide safe, effective care in an environment that is constantly changing and resource constrained. The information explosion, need to manage increasing amounts of essential knowledge and heavy reliance on technology create daily stressors for healthcare providers and highlight the need for adequate educational preparation in use of information and communication technology. Student nurses need basic nursing informatics (NI) knowledge and skills, but NI specialists are rare and few faculty are prepared to teach this content. Faculty need professional development to build knowledge, skills, and confidence in using and teaching informatics so they can effectively integrate it into curricula and produce high quality graduates. The purpose of this research is to foster integration of informatics content and skills into nursing curricula through identification of informatics competencies (for students and faculty), creation of educational modules that prepare faculty to teach these competencies and development of strategies to integrate content into curricula. Theoretical support comes from the Diffusion of Innovations theory combined with precepts of community capacity building. This presentation highlights findings and implications from Phase 1 and 2 of this multi-phase project. Phase 1: Identify informatics competencies needed by nurses to deliver safe effective care in 21st century healthcare environment through literature searches and a national web-based survey of faculty and clinical nurses and administrators. Phase 2: Build capacity for nurse educators proficient in basic informatics knowledge and skills by a) Identifying necessary knowledge and skills to meet competencies; b) Developing web-based education modules; c) Evaluating effectiveness of modules; d) Collaborating with clinical healthcare partners in supporting informatics applications. Phase 3: Develop strategies to integrate informatics content and skills into undergraduate and graduate curricula by a) Identifying courses for leveled informatics content; b) Developing Teaching/Learning strategies for each level
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Capacity for Nurse Educators and Students in Nursing Informatics Competenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158709-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Capacity for Nurse Educators and Students in Nursing Informatics Competencies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kossman, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309 438-2553</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skossm@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Kossman, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Healthcare in the 21st century presents numerous challenges as practitioners strive to provide safe, effective care in an environment that is constantly changing and resource constrained. The information explosion, need to manage increasing amounts of essential knowledge and heavy reliance on technology create daily stressors for healthcare providers and highlight the need for adequate educational preparation in use of information and communication technology. Student nurses need basic nursing informatics (NI) knowledge and skills, but NI specialists are rare and few faculty are prepared to teach this content. Faculty need professional development to build knowledge, skills, and confidence in using and teaching informatics so they can effectively integrate it into curricula and produce high quality graduates. The purpose of this research is to foster integration of informatics content and skills into nursing curricula through identification of informatics competencies (for students and faculty), creation of educational modules that prepare faculty to teach these competencies and development of strategies to integrate content into curricula. Theoretical support comes from the Diffusion of Innovations theory combined with precepts of community capacity building. This presentation highlights findings and implications from Phase 1 and 2 of this multi-phase project. Phase 1: Identify informatics competencies needed by nurses to deliver safe effective care in 21st century healthcare environment through literature searches and a national web-based survey of faculty and clinical nurses and administrators. Phase 2: Build capacity for nurse educators proficient in basic informatics knowledge and skills by a) Identifying necessary knowledge and skills to meet competencies; b) Developing web-based education modules; c) Evaluating effectiveness of modules; d) Collaborating with clinical healthcare partners in supporting informatics applications. Phase 3: Develop strategies to integrate informatics content and skills into undergraduate and graduate curricula by a) Identifying courses for leveled informatics content; b) Developing Teaching/Learning strategies for each level</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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