2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Identity and Construction of the "Other"
Abstract:
Nursing Identity and Construction of the "Other"
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Lagerwey, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Western Michigan University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1903 Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA
Contact Telephone:269-387-8167
Co-Authors:M.D. Lagerwey, Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI;
Purpose: To investigate, in a specific cultural setting, the relationships between nursing identity and perceptions of the "Other." The study also interrogates whiteness as a normative assumption and the extent to which contrasts with those deemed "Other" are a central construction of discourses that perpetuate racism. Questions: How do nurse-authored texts from the Rehoboth Mission in Gallup, New Mexico, provide insights into ideological connections between the nurses' identity and their perceptions of the Navajo for whom they cared? What impact do these discourses have on relationships between nurses and patients? Methods: This study analyzes archived texts written by nurses who practiced among the Navajo at the Rehoboth Mission in New Mexico from 1903-1965. Following critical discourse analysis, their written words are examined within frameworks of broader societal discourses and power differences. Findings: Nurses contrasted their own identity with that of the Navajo in areas such as work ethic, promptness, cleanliness, caring for children, health care, and trustworthiness, and were silent on power differences. The nurses defined these differences as essential aspects of both the Navajo's and their own Dutch-American identities. These differences were defined by the nurses as an essential component of their identity maintenance, distanced the nurses from their patients, and reinforced assumptions of white superiority. Implications: This study's critical analysis of the whiteness of a particular dominant culture and its strong ideological connection with nurses' own identity illustrates practices that leave dominant nursing cultures hidden, un-examined, and yet powerfully normative.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Identity and Construction of the "Other"en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Identity and Construction of the &quot;Other&quot;</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lagerwey, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1903 Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">269-387-8167</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.lagerwey@wmich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.D. Lagerwey, Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To investigate, in a specific cultural setting, the relationships between nursing identity and perceptions of the &quot;Other.&quot; The study also interrogates whiteness as a normative assumption and the extent to which contrasts with those deemed &quot;Other&quot; are a central construction of discourses that perpetuate racism. Questions: How do nurse-authored texts from the Rehoboth Mission in Gallup, New Mexico, provide insights into ideological connections between the nurses' identity and their perceptions of the Navajo for whom they cared? What impact do these discourses have on relationships between nurses and patients? Methods: This study analyzes archived texts written by nurses who practiced among the Navajo at the Rehoboth Mission in New Mexico from 1903-1965. Following critical discourse analysis, their written words are examined within frameworks of broader societal discourses and power differences. Findings: Nurses contrasted their own identity with that of the Navajo in areas such as work ethic, promptness, cleanliness, caring for children, health care, and trustworthiness, and were silent on power differences. The nurses defined these differences as essential aspects of both the Navajo's and their own Dutch-American identities. These differences were defined by the nurses as an essential component of their identity maintenance, distanced the nurses from their patients, and reinforced assumptions of white superiority. Implications: This study's critical analysis of the whiteness of a particular dominant culture and its strong ideological connection with nurses' own identity illustrates practices that leave dominant nursing cultures hidden, un-examined, and yet powerfully normative.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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