2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158712
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Stigma in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Abstract:
The Experience of Stigma in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Larson, Janet, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:400 N Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:708 466 3916
Co-Authors:J.L. Larson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; J.L. Larson, M.C. Kapella, B. Berger, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Purpose. People with COPD experience unpleasant symptoms, including dyspnea, fatigue, tenacious secretions, and a disruptive cough, all of which place them at risk for stigmatization. The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to describe experiences of stigma from the perspective of the person with COPD. Methods. Sixteen subjects (11 men, 5 women) (mean(SD)), age 70(8) years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 48(14)% predicted, participated in individual, in-depth interviews regarding effects of COPD on their social relationships and their experiences with COPD-related stigma. Recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed for categories and themes by all three investigators in parallel and as a group using Atlas software. Results. Most people were aware of the potential for stigma in social interactions, especially with strangers, but also with family. For most, the possibility of stigma was not a major concern, but several participants were eloquent about their perceptions of the possible impact of COPD on social interactions. Social changes included "entitled intrusiveness," unsolicited comments and advice from others. When others became aware of the person's COPD, they seemed to feel entitled to give advice. Triggers for COPD-related stigma included: physical limitations, coughing spells, sputum production, using inhalers or oxygen, needing a wheelchair in malls or airports. Perceived blame from others was entirely related to smoking, and the search for blame was nearly instantaneous. But there was recognition of the addictive properties of cigarettes, which helped modulate the amount of blame. Efforts to avoid stigma experiences included minimizing the obtrusiveness of symptoms or treatments and, when possible, covering or concealing symptoms or treatments. For some their sense of self worth was diminished by their awareness of COPD-related functional limitations. Conclusion. Stigma is a significant concern for some people with COPD and most have an awareness of the potential for social awkwardness related to the disease. For many, the decreases in social activities appear to be pragmatic adaptations to functional limitations, but may also carry elements of avoiding potentially awkward, stigmatizing situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Stigma in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158712-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of Stigma in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larson, Janet, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 N Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708 466 3916</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janetlar@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.L. Larson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; J.L. Larson, M.C. Kapella, B. Berger, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. People with COPD experience unpleasant symptoms, including dyspnea, fatigue, tenacious secretions, and a disruptive cough, all of which place them at risk for stigmatization. The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to describe experiences of stigma from the perspective of the person with COPD. Methods. Sixteen subjects (11 men, 5 women) (mean(SD)), age 70(8) years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 48(14)% predicted, participated in individual, in-depth interviews regarding effects of COPD on their social relationships and their experiences with COPD-related stigma. Recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed for categories and themes by all three investigators in parallel and as a group using Atlas software. Results. Most people were aware of the potential for stigma in social interactions, especially with strangers, but also with family. For most, the possibility of stigma was not a major concern, but several participants were eloquent about their perceptions of the possible impact of COPD on social interactions. Social changes included &quot;entitled intrusiveness,&quot; unsolicited comments and advice from others. When others became aware of the person's COPD, they seemed to feel entitled to give advice. Triggers for COPD-related stigma included: physical limitations, coughing spells, sputum production, using inhalers or oxygen, needing a wheelchair in malls or airports. Perceived blame from others was entirely related to smoking, and the search for blame was nearly instantaneous. But there was recognition of the addictive properties of cigarettes, which helped modulate the amount of blame. Efforts to avoid stigma experiences included minimizing the obtrusiveness of symptoms or treatments and, when possible, covering or concealing symptoms or treatments. For some their sense of self worth was diminished by their awareness of COPD-related functional limitations. Conclusion. Stigma is a significant concern for some people with COPD and most have an awareness of the potential for social awkwardness related to the disease. For many, the decreases in social activities appear to be pragmatic adaptations to functional limitations, but may also carry elements of avoiding potentially awkward, stigmatizing situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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