A Look Inside the Black Box: Process Evaluation of a Peer Group Intervention for HIV Prevention in Malawi

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158717
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Look Inside the Black Box: Process Evaluation of a Peer Group Intervention for HIV Prevention in Malawi
Abstract:
A Look Inside the Black Box: Process Evaluation of a Peer Group Intervention for HIV Prevention in Malawi
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:McCreary, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing
Title:Health Systems Science
Contact Address:UIC College of Nursing (M/C 802), 845 S Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Contact Telephone:312-355-3446
Co-Authors:L.L. McCreary, Health Systems Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, IL; C.N. Kaponda, R. Ngalande, U. Kafulafula, Maternal and Child Health, University of Malawi Kamuzu College of Nursing, Lilongwe, MALAWI; D.L. Nkomba-Je
Purpose: Little research has examined what occurs during peer group interventions that makes them effective for promoting behavioral change. The purpose of this process evaluation study was to identify changes in individual and group dynamics observed during a peer group HIV prevention intervention in Malawi. Theoretical Framework: Adult learning theory provided the framework for this study. Sample: We observed a convenience sample of 293 sessions (67 discrete groups, mean size 10.16 plus or minus 1.93) attended separately by groups of adults, adolescents and health workers, and co-facilitated by nurses, other health workers and community adults. Methods: Trained observers used our collaboratively developed observation guide with standardized descriptors to rate group member engagement, peer leader facilitation skills and other critical elements of group dynamics across the 6-session intervention. To capture change within each 1-3 hour session, observations were conducted in 30-minute periods. Results: 1-way ANOVA demonstrated that group member engagement increased significantly for adults [F(3)=3.43, p <.05] from first to third 30-minute period within each session. Engagement also increased from session 1 to 6, but did not reach significance for any group due to small numbers of each session observed for each group. Peer leader facilitation skills increased significantly from session 1 to 6 for adults [F(5)=2.75, p <.05] and adolescents [F(5)=5.62, p <.001], but not for health workers. All groups were increasingly "more like a peer group" than classroom from session 1 to 6, but the difference was significant only for health workers [F(5)=3.70, p <.01]. Engagement and facilitation were moderately correlated for adults [Pearson's coefficient=519, (p <.001)]. Linear regression demonstrated that engagement and facilitation together explained a significant proportion of the variance in "more like a peer group" for adults [R²=.231, F(2)=16.18, p <.001)] and health workers [R²=.124, F(2)=3.70, p <.01)] but not adolescents. Conclusions: Process evaluation builds the evidence base for peer group interventions by documenting the effectiveness of peer leaders and the group process that occurs during the intervention. Attending to group process can strengthen groups facilitated by nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Look Inside the Black Box: Process Evaluation of a Peer Group Intervention for HIV Prevention in Malawien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158717-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Look Inside the Black Box: Process Evaluation of a Peer Group Intervention for HIV Prevention in Malawi</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCreary, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Health Systems Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">UIC College of Nursing (M/C 802), 845 S Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-355-3446</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccreary@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.L. McCreary, Health Systems Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, IL; C.N. Kaponda, R. Ngalande, U. Kafulafula, Maternal and Child Health, University of Malawi Kamuzu College of Nursing, Lilongwe, MALAWI; D.L. Nkomba-Je</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Little research has examined what occurs during peer group interventions that makes them effective for promoting behavioral change. The purpose of this process evaluation study was to identify changes in individual and group dynamics observed during a peer group HIV prevention intervention in Malawi. Theoretical Framework: Adult learning theory provided the framework for this study. Sample: We observed a convenience sample of 293 sessions (67 discrete groups, mean size 10.16 plus or minus 1.93) attended separately by groups of adults, adolescents and health workers, and co-facilitated by nurses, other health workers and community adults. Methods: Trained observers used our collaboratively developed observation guide with standardized descriptors to rate group member engagement, peer leader facilitation skills and other critical elements of group dynamics across the 6-session intervention. To capture change within each 1-3 hour session, observations were conducted in 30-minute periods. Results: 1-way ANOVA demonstrated that group member engagement increased significantly for adults [F(3)=3.43, p &lt;.05] from first to third 30-minute period within each session. Engagement also increased from session 1 to 6, but did not reach significance for any group due to small numbers of each session observed for each group. Peer leader facilitation skills increased significantly from session 1 to 6 for adults [F(5)=2.75, p &lt;.05] and adolescents [F(5)=5.62, p &lt;.001], but not for health workers. All groups were increasingly &quot;more like a peer group&quot; than classroom from session 1 to 6, but the difference was significant only for health workers [F(5)=3.70, p &lt;.01]. Engagement and facilitation were moderately correlated for adults [Pearson's coefficient=519, (p &lt;.001)]. Linear regression demonstrated that engagement and facilitation together explained a significant proportion of the variance in &quot;more like a peer group&quot; for adults [R&sup2;=.231, F(2)=16.18, p &lt;.001)] and health workers [R&sup2;=.124, F(2)=3.70, p &lt;.01)] but not adolescents. Conclusions: Process evaluation builds the evidence base for peer group interventions by documenting the effectiveness of peer leaders and the group process that occurs during the intervention. Attending to group process can strengthen groups facilitated by nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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