2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158718
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Walk A Hound, Lose a Pound, & Stay Fit for Seniors
Abstract:
Walk A Hound, Lose a Pound, & Stay Fit for Seniors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:McKenney, Charlotte, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:College of Veterinary Medicine
Contact Address:Clydesdale Hall, Annex #2, 379 East Campus Drive, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573 884-6282
Co-Authors:R.A. Johnson, Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; R.A. Johnson, C.A. McKenney, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Background: The rising rate of obesity in older adults is linked with the national problem of limited physical activity (PA), resulting in chronic illness. These illnesses require innovative, effective interventions. Dog walking may improve long-term PA by improving readiness and physical function. Methods: A three-group, repeated measures design tested efficacy of a 12-week (5 day/week) shelter dog walking program for community-dwelling adults over age 65. To control cross-group contamination, each of three retirement facilities was assigned as the shelter dog walking (DW), human walking companion (HWC), or no-treatment control (C) group. Facilities were comparable in size, demographic composition, & physical ability level of residents. The DW group members selected a dog matching their walking capability & walked on a paved road at the animal shelter. The HWC group identified a walking partner & walked on a paved road at their residence. Both groups were led daily through a muscle stretching sequence and accompanied by study staff. Pretest, mid-trial & posttest findings included physical function (6 minute walk), weight, physical activity during the previous week, physical activity stage of change, mood & social support. We also assessed dog ownership history, beliefs about dog ownership, & physical activity pattern for each decade of life. Mid-trial data included the 6 minute walk & weekly activity data. Results: Mid-trial data (6-weeks) will be presented. Sixty-five adults participated {DW n=12, HWC n=23 & control n=20}. Fourteen males & 41 females, ranged in age from 67-97 years (Mean=85). The paper will describe these & other findings in context with participants' comments about their experience. Conclusions: Participants in the DW group immediately expressed affinity for the shelter dogs. The walking ability of the DW group improved over their pre-test physical function test. Given the added challenge of walking a dog on a lead, they stated that their balance & walking confidence improved. One participant was routinely seen carrying (not touching down) her cane while walking a dog. Participants repeatedly thanked the researchers for the program because it "gets me out," "is helping me to feel more confident," & "is fun."
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWalk A Hound, Lose a Pound, & Stay Fit for Seniorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158718-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Walk A Hound, Lose a Pound, &amp; Stay Fit for Seniors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKenney, Charlotte, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Veterinary Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Clydesdale Hall, Annex #2, 379 East Campus Drive, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 884-6282</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mckenneyc@health.missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.A. Johnson, Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; R.A. Johnson, C.A. McKenney, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The rising rate of obesity in older adults is linked with the national problem of limited physical activity (PA), resulting in chronic illness. These illnesses require innovative, effective interventions. Dog walking may improve long-term PA by improving readiness and physical function. Methods: A three-group, repeated measures design tested efficacy of a 12-week (5 day/week) shelter dog walking program for community-dwelling adults over age 65. To control cross-group contamination, each of three retirement facilities was assigned as the shelter dog walking (DW), human walking companion (HWC), or no-treatment control (C) group. Facilities were comparable in size, demographic composition, &amp; physical ability level of residents. The DW group members selected a dog matching their walking capability &amp; walked on a paved road at the animal shelter. The HWC group identified a walking partner &amp; walked on a paved road at their residence. Both groups were led daily through a muscle stretching sequence and accompanied by study staff. Pretest, mid-trial &amp; posttest findings included physical function (6 minute walk), weight, physical activity during the previous week, physical activity stage of change, mood &amp; social support. We also assessed dog ownership history, beliefs about dog ownership, &amp; physical activity pattern for each decade of life. Mid-trial data included the 6 minute walk &amp; weekly activity data. Results: Mid-trial data (6-weeks) will be presented. Sixty-five adults participated {DW n=12, HWC n=23 &amp; control n=20}. Fourteen males &amp; 41 females, ranged in age from 67-97 years (Mean=85). The paper will describe these &amp; other findings in context with participants' comments about their experience. Conclusions: Participants in the DW group immediately expressed affinity for the shelter dogs. The walking ability of the DW group improved over their pre-test physical function test. Given the added challenge of walking a dog on a lead, they stated that their balance &amp; walking confidence improved. One participant was routinely seen carrying (not touching down) her cane while walking a dog. Participants repeatedly thanked the researchers for the program because it &quot;gets me out,&quot; &quot;is helping me to feel more confident,&quot; &amp; &quot;is fun.&quot;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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