2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158719
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scale
Abstract:
Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mitchell, Kimberly, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis
Contact Address:12521 N. Englewood Ct., Dunlap, IL, 61525, USA
Contact Telephone:309-243-5080
Co-Authors:K.A. Mitchell, S.M. Rawl, Nursing, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN;
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U. S. It is estimated that 76-90% of CRC could be prevented by identifying and removing polyps via colonoscopies, yet less than 60% of people 50 years or older have ever had a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy. Embarrassment has been identified as one important barrier to screening colonoscopies, and although other barriers have been studied, little is known about embarrassment. Further, no instrument is available to measure this construct. The aim of this study was to estimate reliability and validity of a new instrument, the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scale (CES). Two conceptual frameworks, the Health Belief Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change, guided this study. Thirty six items were developed as a result of reviewing the literature and a clinical inquiry. Content validity was established by three national experts resulting in a reduction to 26 items. Based on the findings of a pilot study (n=10) using cognitive interviewing, the number of items was reduced to 15. The psychometric properties of the 15-item instrument were tested using a cross-sectional, descriptive research design. Data were collected using a mailed survey of HMO members aged 50-65 years (n=234). The response rate was 68%. Psychometric analysis began with principle components analysis, uncovering redundancy, resulting in a reduction to six items. Internal consistency of the six-item CES was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha of .89. Construct validity was established in three ways. First, unidimensionality of the instrument was validated when all six items loaded highly on one component. Second, the CES scores were inversely related to colonoscopy adherence; participants who were compliant with colonoscopy had lower mean CES scores than those who were not compliant (p<.001). Third, participants in the action phase of adoption for colonoscopy had lower mean CES scores than those in precontemplation (p<.001). A reliable and valid instrument to accurately assess colonoscopy-related embarrassment will allow future researchers to measure the impact of interventions to reduce embarrassment. By minimizing embarrassment, more individuals will be screened resulting in lower morbidity and mortality from CRC.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Psychometric Evaluation of the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158719-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Kimberly, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">12521 N. Englewood Ct., Dunlap, IL, 61525, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-243-5080</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kmitch.13@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.A. Mitchell, S.M. Rawl, Nursing, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U. S. It is estimated that 76-90% of CRC could be prevented by identifying and removing polyps via colonoscopies, yet less than 60% of people 50 years or older have ever had a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy. Embarrassment has been identified as one important barrier to screening colonoscopies, and although other barriers have been studied, little is known about embarrassment. Further, no instrument is available to measure this construct. The aim of this study was to estimate reliability and validity of a new instrument, the Colonoscopy Embarrassment Scale (CES). Two conceptual frameworks, the Health Belief Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change, guided this study. Thirty six items were developed as a result of reviewing the literature and a clinical inquiry. Content validity was established by three national experts resulting in a reduction to 26 items. Based on the findings of a pilot study (n=10) using cognitive interviewing, the number of items was reduced to 15. The psychometric properties of the 15-item instrument were tested using a cross-sectional, descriptive research design. Data were collected using a mailed survey of HMO members aged 50-65 years (n=234). The response rate was 68%. Psychometric analysis began with principle components analysis, uncovering redundancy, resulting in a reduction to six items. Internal consistency of the six-item CES was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha of .89. Construct validity was established in three ways. First, unidimensionality of the instrument was validated when all six items loaded highly on one component. Second, the CES scores were inversely related to colonoscopy adherence; participants who were compliant with colonoscopy had lower mean CES scores than those who were not compliant (p&lt;.001). Third, participants in the action phase of adoption for colonoscopy had lower mean CES scores than those in precontemplation (p&lt;.001). A reliable and valid instrument to accurately assess colonoscopy-related embarrassment will allow future researchers to measure the impact of interventions to reduce embarrassment. By minimizing embarrassment, more individuals will be screened resulting in lower morbidity and mortality from CRC.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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