2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158720
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participant Reports of Colonoscopy-Related Embarrassment: Sources and Resolution
Abstract:
Participant Reports of Colonoscopy-Related Embarrassment: Sources and Resolution
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mitchell, Kimberly, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis
Contact Address:12521 N. Englewood Ct., Dunlap, IL, 61525, USA
Contact Telephone:309-243-5080
Co-Authors:K.A. Mitchell, S.M. Rawl, Nursing, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN;
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U. S. Adenomatous polyps in the colon are thought to be precursors to cancerous CRC lesions. It is estimated that 76-90% of CRC could be prevented by identifying and removing polyps via colonoscopies, yet less than 60% of people 50 years or older have ever had a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy. Embarrassment has been identified as one important barrier to screening colonoscopies, but little is known about embarrassment as a barrier to this lifesaving test. The aims of this study were to identify perceived sources of embarrassment related to having a screening colonoscopy and to determine ways in which this embarrassment could be reduced or eliminated. The Health Belief Model was the theoretical framework for this study. Participants, aged 50-65 years, were members of a large HMO (n=234). Data were collected using two open-ended questions at the conclusion of a mailed survey. The survey response rate was 68%. The first open-ended question was, "For me the most embarrassing part of having a colonoscopy would be..." and the second was "I would be less embarrassed to have a colonoscopy if..." Data were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Of the 234 participants, 209 (89%) answered the question about the most embarrassing part of a colonoscopy. Of the 209 responses, 118 (56%) participants identified some aspect of having a colonoscopy that was embarrassing. From the 118 responses, six themes including bodily exposure (n=19, 16%), completing the bowel prep (n=16, 14%), the procedure itself (n=15, 13%), social concerns (n=15, 13%), gas (n=13, 11%), and consciousness (n=12, 10%) were identified. For the question regarding ways to make a colonoscopy less embarrassing, 169 (72%) answered the question and of these, 90 (53%) offered suggestions for making the test less embarrassing. The four themes identified from these 90 responses included using a different procedure (n=27, 30%), anonymity/familiarity (n=18, 20%), and choice of the gender of the endoscopist (n=15, 17%). The knowledge gained in this study is important to the development of interventions to reduce or eliminate embarrassment so that more people will obtain a colonoscopy resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality from CRC.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipant Reports of Colonoscopy-Related Embarrassment: Sources and Resolutionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158720-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participant Reports of Colonoscopy-Related Embarrassment: Sources and Resolution</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Kimberly, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">12521 N. Englewood Ct., Dunlap, IL, 61525, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-243-5080</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kmitch.13@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.A. Mitchell, S.M. Rawl, Nursing, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U. S. Adenomatous polyps in the colon are thought to be precursors to cancerous CRC lesions. It is estimated that 76-90% of CRC could be prevented by identifying and removing polyps via colonoscopies, yet less than 60% of people 50 years or older have ever had a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy. Embarrassment has been identified as one important barrier to screening colonoscopies, but little is known about embarrassment as a barrier to this lifesaving test. The aims of this study were to identify perceived sources of embarrassment related to having a screening colonoscopy and to determine ways in which this embarrassment could be reduced or eliminated. The Health Belief Model was the theoretical framework for this study. Participants, aged 50-65 years, were members of a large HMO (n=234). Data were collected using two open-ended questions at the conclusion of a mailed survey. The survey response rate was 68%. The first open-ended question was, &quot;For me the most embarrassing part of having a colonoscopy would be...&quot; and the second was &quot;I would be less embarrassed to have a colonoscopy if...&quot; Data were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Of the 234 participants, 209 (89%) answered the question about the most embarrassing part of a colonoscopy. Of the 209 responses, 118 (56%) participants identified some aspect of having a colonoscopy that was embarrassing. From the 118 responses, six themes including bodily exposure (n=19, 16%), completing the bowel prep (n=16, 14%), the procedure itself (n=15, 13%), social concerns (n=15, 13%), gas (n=13, 11%), and consciousness (n=12, 10%) were identified. For the question regarding ways to make a colonoscopy less embarrassing, 169 (72%) answered the question and of these, 90 (53%) offered suggestions for making the test less embarrassing. The four themes identified from these 90 responses included using a different procedure (n=27, 30%), anonymity/familiarity (n=18, 20%), and choice of the gender of the endoscopist (n=15, 17%). The knowledge gained in this study is important to the development of interventions to reduce or eliminate embarrassment so that more people will obtain a colonoscopy resulting in reduced morbidity and mortality from CRC.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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