The Effects of Dance on Physical Functioning and Disability in African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158721
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Dance on Physical Functioning and Disability in African American Women
Abstract:
The Effects of Dance on Physical Functioning and Disability in African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Murrock, Carolyn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:10887 Ravenna Road, Twinsburg, OH, 44087, USA
Contact Telephone:330-487-5612
Co-Authors:C. J. Murrock, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
The majority of African American women are sedentary which can lead to decreased physical functioning and disability. The purpose of this dance intervention study was to analyze the differences in physical functioning and disability in sedentary African American women from baseline to 8 weeks, and at 18 weeks, compared to women who did not receive the intervention. Choreographed to gospel music, the dance intervention was two times per week for 8 weeks and was taught by an African American woman. To control for diffusion of treatment, two African American churches were randomly assigned to either the intervention church or comparison church protocols. The convenience sample consisted of 126 participants (66 experimental and 60 comparison group), ages ranged from 36-82 years. The dependent variables of physical functioning, disability frequency, and disability limitation were measured with the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) over the 3 time points. Following a significant MANCOVA, post-hoc univariate ANCOVA tests were conducted separately on each dependent variable and showed: significant differences in physical functioning by group at 8 weeks (p <.001, F(6,84) = 63.52, eta² =.42) and at 18 weeks (p <.001, F(6,84) = 60.65, eta² =.41); significant differences in disability frequency by group at 8 weeks (p <.001, F(6,84) = 8.46, eta² =.49) and at 18 weeks (p <.001; F(6,84) = 38.38, eta² =.30); and significant differences in disability limitation by group at 8 weeks (p <.001; F(6,84) = 13.50, eta² =.13) and at 18 weeks (p = .015, F(6,84) = 6.14, eta² =.07). Thus, the results of this study indicated that dancing two times per week for 8 weeks was often enough to show increased physical functioning and decreased disability frequency and limitation in sedentary African American women compared to those who did not receive the dance intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Dance on Physical Functioning and Disability in African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158721-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Dance on Physical Functioning and Disability in African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murrock, Carolyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10887 Ravenna Road, Twinsburg, OH, 44087, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-487-5612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cjm10@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. J. Murrock, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The majority of African American women are sedentary which can lead to decreased physical functioning and disability. The purpose of this dance intervention study was to analyze the differences in physical functioning and disability in sedentary African American women from baseline to 8 weeks, and at 18 weeks, compared to women who did not receive the intervention. Choreographed to gospel music, the dance intervention was two times per week for 8 weeks and was taught by an African American woman. To control for diffusion of treatment, two African American churches were randomly assigned to either the intervention church or comparison church protocols. The convenience sample consisted of 126 participants (66 experimental and 60 comparison group), ages ranged from 36-82 years. The dependent variables of physical functioning, disability frequency, and disability limitation were measured with the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) over the 3 time points. Following a significant MANCOVA, post-hoc univariate ANCOVA tests were conducted separately on each dependent variable and showed: significant differences in physical functioning by group at 8 weeks (p &lt;.001, F(6,84) = 63.52, eta&sup2; =.42) and at 18 weeks (p &lt;.001, F(6,84) = 60.65, eta&sup2; =.41); significant differences in disability frequency by group at 8 weeks (p &lt;.001, F(6,84) = 8.46, eta&sup2; =.49) and at 18 weeks (p &lt;.001; F(6,84) = 38.38, eta&sup2; =.30); and significant differences in disability limitation by group at 8 weeks (p &lt;.001; F(6,84) = 13.50, eta&sup2; =.13) and at 18 weeks (p = .015, F(6,84) = 6.14, eta&sup2; =.07). Thus, the results of this study indicated that dancing two times per week for 8 weeks was often enough to show increased physical functioning and decreased disability frequency and limitation in sedentary African American women compared to those who did not receive the dance intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:19:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:19:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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