2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158724
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Church-Based Physical Activity Program for African American Women
Abstract:
Church-Based Physical Activity Program for African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Peterson, Jane, PhD Nursing
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri Kansas City
Contact Address:2464 Charlotte St., Kansas City, KS, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816-235-5963
Co-Authors:J.A. Peterson, Nursing, University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, MO;
Background: African American (AA) women have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular (CVD) risks including physical inactivity than Caucasian women. Increased physical activity is known to reduce the risks for CVD. Yet over 55% of adult AA women in the U.S. are sedentary, reporting no leisure-time physical activity. Previous research has documented positive health behavior changes resulted from health promotion interventions conducted in AA churches. In a sample of midlife (35-65 years) AA women, objectives were to: 1) appraise and modify the church-based Heart and Soul Physical Activity Program (HSPAP), a physical activity intervention conceptualized in Wills' social comparison theory; and 2) conduct a feasibility study to determine if the HSPAP promotes physical activity in AA women. Methods: 1) Eight women participated in focus group evaluation of the HSPAP to establish its cultural and social appropriateness. Data were analyzed by transcribing notes verbatim, coding responses, and identifying themes. 2) Fourteen midlife AA women participated in a six-week pilot study to test the feasibility of the HSPAP in promoting physical activity. Results: Focus group participants felt an active lifestyle is important to health, increasing longevity and quality of life and prevents chronic diseases. Women perceived their physical activity would increase if recommended by health professionals, a "buddy system" existed to increase accountability and motivation, and prayer and scriptures would reinforce God's Word to care for oneself. Study participants increased moderate intensity physical activity from a mean of 96 minutes/week at baseline to 163 minutes/week in six weeks. Conclusions: Positive trends in increased physical activity were noted in midlife AA women following qualitative evaluation and testing of the HSPAP. Nurses can build on the inherent support within the context of faith communities to promote physical activity. The HSPAP appears to be a promising, culturally sensitive strategy to increase physical activity in AA women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChurch-Based Physical Activity Program for African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158724-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Church-Based Physical Activity Program for African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peterson, Jane, PhD Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2464 Charlotte St., Kansas City, KS, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816-235-5963</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">petersonja@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.A. Peterson, Nursing, University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: African American (AA) women have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular (CVD) risks including physical inactivity than Caucasian women. Increased physical activity is known to reduce the risks for CVD. Yet over 55% of adult AA women in the U.S. are sedentary, reporting no leisure-time physical activity. Previous research has documented positive health behavior changes resulted from health promotion interventions conducted in AA churches. In a sample of midlife (35-65 years) AA women, objectives were to: 1) appraise and modify the church-based Heart and Soul Physical Activity Program (HSPAP), a physical activity intervention conceptualized in Wills' social comparison theory; and 2) conduct a feasibility study to determine if the HSPAP promotes physical activity in AA women. Methods: 1) Eight women participated in focus group evaluation of the HSPAP to establish its cultural and social appropriateness. Data were analyzed by transcribing notes verbatim, coding responses, and identifying themes. 2) Fourteen midlife AA women participated in a six-week pilot study to test the feasibility of the HSPAP in promoting physical activity. Results: Focus group participants felt an active lifestyle is important to health, increasing longevity and quality of life and prevents chronic diseases. Women perceived their physical activity would increase if recommended by health professionals, a &quot;buddy system&quot; existed to increase accountability and motivation, and prayer and scriptures would reinforce God's Word to care for oneself. Study participants increased moderate intensity physical activity from a mean of 96 minutes/week at baseline to 163 minutes/week in six weeks. Conclusions: Positive trends in increased physical activity were noted in midlife AA women following qualitative evaluation and testing of the HSPAP. Nurses can build on the inherent support within the context of faith communities to promote physical activity. The HSPAP appears to be a promising, culturally sensitive strategy to increase physical activity in AA women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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