The Lived Experience of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Individuals Interactions with Healthcare Providers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158728
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Individuals Interactions with Healthcare Providers
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Individuals Interactions with Healthcare Providers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Reising, Deanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, ANEF
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:1033 East Third Street, Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
Contact Telephone:812-855-1728
Co-Authors:D.L. Reising, A.J. Gastelum, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN;
Introduction: The 2000 United States census reports that GLBT families live in nearly 100% of all counties and that over one million children are being raised by GLBT couples (US Census, 2000). The growing population of GLBT indicates that a healthcare provider will be delivering care to an individual is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. Treating the needs of individual clients necessitates knowing their sexual orientation. Understanding the impact of sexual orientation is important to delivering holistic care. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore personal accounts describing the lived experiences of GLBT individuals interacting with health care providers. Methodology: A pheonomenological approach was used to uncover the lived experiences of the participants. Participants included nine female lesbians, and one gay male. Open-ended interviews were conducted to expose the phenomenon of the health care experience. Results: The themes that emerged included: Inappropriate care plans, perceptions of health care providers by GLBT individuals (changes in view over time, comfort level disclosing sexual orientation), and the impact of having understanding clinicians. Results of the study support that GLBT individuals may avoid seeking health care, may avoid disclosing their sexual orientation, or may be treated with inappropriate plans of care. Additionally, it was found that positive interactions with health care providers can improve motivation to seek care. Conclusion: Understanding perceptions of GLBT individuals when visiting health care providers improves understanding GLBT individual's motivation to access health resources. Health care providers making small changes to their practice can improve access to and motivation for appropriate treatment, thereby reducing the incidence of health risks. Implications for Nursing Practice: Encouraging and providing resources for health care students to learn cultural competency for the GLBT community are effective means of improving accessibility through raising awareness about the needs of GLBT clients. Improving accessibility and increasing comfort for GLBT clients may help to increase healthcare use thereby decreasing the special health risks this community faces.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Individuals Interactions with Healthcare Providersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158728-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) Individuals Interactions with Healthcare Providers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reising, Deanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, ANEF</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1033 East Third Street, Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-855-1728</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dreising@indiana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.L. Reising, A.J. Gastelum, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The 2000 United States census reports that GLBT families live in nearly 100% of all counties and that over one million children are being raised by GLBT couples (US Census, 2000). The growing population of GLBT indicates that a healthcare provider will be delivering care to an individual is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. Treating the needs of individual clients necessitates knowing their sexual orientation. Understanding the impact of sexual orientation is important to delivering holistic care. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore personal accounts describing the lived experiences of GLBT individuals interacting with health care providers. Methodology: A pheonomenological approach was used to uncover the lived experiences of the participants. Participants included nine female lesbians, and one gay male. Open-ended interviews were conducted to expose the phenomenon of the health care experience. Results: The themes that emerged included: Inappropriate care plans, perceptions of health care providers by GLBT individuals (changes in view over time, comfort level disclosing sexual orientation), and the impact of having understanding clinicians. Results of the study support that GLBT individuals may avoid seeking health care, may avoid disclosing their sexual orientation, or may be treated with inappropriate plans of care. Additionally, it was found that positive interactions with health care providers can improve motivation to seek care. Conclusion: Understanding perceptions of GLBT individuals when visiting health care providers improves understanding GLBT individual's motivation to access health resources. Health care providers making small changes to their practice can improve access to and motivation for appropriate treatment, thereby reducing the incidence of health risks. Implications for Nursing Practice: Encouraging and providing resources for health care students to learn cultural competency for the GLBT community are effective means of improving accessibility through raising awareness about the needs of GLBT clients. Improving accessibility and increasing comfort for GLBT clients may help to increase healthcare use thereby decreasing the special health risks this community faces.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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