Adolescent Sexual Harassment of Peers: A Predictor of Perpetration of Sexual Assault?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Sexual Harassment of Peers: A Predictor of Perpetration of Sexual Assault?
Abstract:
Adolescent Sexual Harassment of Peers: A Predictor of Perpetration of Sexual Assault?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ross-Durow, Paula, Ph.D., R.N.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Institute for Research on Women and Gender
Contact Address:204 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-615-8758
Co-Authors:P.L. Ross-Durow, C.J. Boyd, A. Young, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Previous research has demonstrated that sexual harassment is a pervasive problem among adolescents, but it is unclear whether this behavior ultimately leads to perpetration of unwanted sexual contact. Utilizing Jessor's social-psychological framework which suggests prediction of future risk behaviors based on previous engagement in problem behaviors, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether, over time, adolescents who engaged in certain problem behaviors?including perpetration of peer heterosexual harassment?were more likely to perpetrate unwanted heterosexual contact with their peers than those who did not engage in these behaviors. The study utilized secondary analysis of self-reported survey data of 7th-12th grade students in one large metropolitan public school system. A longitudinal design was employed using information provided by the same students at two data collection points one year apart (2005 and 2006). The sample included 558 ethnically diverse students, 55.7% of whom were girls. The mean age of the adolescents was 14.28 (SD = 1.46). Among 2005 non-perpetrators of unwanted sexual contact, adolescents who had perpetrated sexual harassment in 2005 were significantly more likely to report perpetrating unwanted sexual contact with peers in 2006 than students who did not report sexually harassing peers. These findings may suggest that intervening with peer heterosexual harassment among adolescents is a potential method to reduce unwanted peer heterosexual contact in the future. It is important that nurses be involved in heightening the awareness of adolescents, parents, school personnel, and community service agents regarding the frequency of peer abusive behaviors, identify potential risk factors for these behaviors, and actively intervene at all levels to prevent them from occurring. It is through these prevention efforts that negative health and life outcomes in adolescents can be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Sexual Harassment of Peers: A Predictor of Perpetration of Sexual Assault?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Sexual Harassment of Peers: A Predictor of Perpetration of Sexual Assault?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross-Durow, Paula, Ph.D., R.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Institute for Research on Women and Gender</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">204 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-615-8758</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rossduro@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.L. Ross-Durow, C.J. Boyd, A. Young, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Previous research has demonstrated that sexual harassment is a pervasive problem among adolescents, but it is unclear whether this behavior ultimately leads to perpetration of unwanted sexual contact. Utilizing Jessor's social-psychological framework which suggests prediction of future risk behaviors based on previous engagement in problem behaviors, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether, over time, adolescents who engaged in certain problem behaviors?including perpetration of peer heterosexual harassment?were more likely to perpetrate unwanted heterosexual contact with their peers than those who did not engage in these behaviors. The study utilized secondary analysis of self-reported survey data of 7th-12th grade students in one large metropolitan public school system. A longitudinal design was employed using information provided by the same students at two data collection points one year apart (2005 and 2006). The sample included 558 ethnically diverse students, 55.7% of whom were girls. The mean age of the adolescents was 14.28 (SD = 1.46). Among 2005 non-perpetrators of unwanted sexual contact, adolescents who had perpetrated sexual harassment in 2005 were significantly more likely to report perpetrating unwanted sexual contact with peers in 2006 than students who did not report sexually harassing peers. These findings may suggest that intervening with peer heterosexual harassment among adolescents is a potential method to reduce unwanted peer heterosexual contact in the future. It is important that nurses be involved in heightening the awareness of adolescents, parents, school personnel, and community service agents regarding the frequency of peer abusive behaviors, identify potential risk factors for these behaviors, and actively intervene at all levels to prevent them from occurring. It is through these prevention efforts that negative health and life outcomes in adolescents can be addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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