In-Hospital Survival Skills Training for Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Children and Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158735
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In-Hospital Survival Skills Training for Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Children and Parents
Abstract:
In-Hospital Survival Skills Training for Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Children and Parents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schmidt, Cynthia, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Family Health and Community Health Nursing
Contact Address:7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3921
Co-Authors:C. Schmidt, L. Bernaix,, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL; M. Chiappetta, E. Carroll, A. Beland, Children's Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL;
The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) for a child or adolescent is not only anxiety producing, but is also life-altering. At the time of diagnosis, parents and/or children must gain significant knowledge and learn specific skills in order to avoid life threatening episodes of abnormal blood glucose levels. This education, often called"survival skills training," typically occurs during a 3-day hospital stay. The goal of this qualitative descriptive study, which was guided by Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (2001), was to describe children's and parents' perceptions of the initial in-hospital education and support received from nurses following the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. A child interview guide and written parent survey were developed, reviewed by a panel of experts, and piloted with 3 dyads. Children were interviewed and parents completed the survey immediately prior to the routine two-week post discharge appointment. Twenty-one children (8 boys and 13 girls) aged 8 to 15 years and their parent(s) participated in the study. Data were analyzed using the reductionistic and constructionistic steps described by Knafl and Webster (1988). Children and parents were satisfied with the support and survival skills training they received. Teaching strategies most appreciated by children were demonstration and return demonstration, supervision of skill performance, and encouraging comments made by nurses. Parents appreciated demonstration and positive feedback from the nurse directed to their child. Children and parents expressed their thoughts about the experience of the diagnosis itself and the importance of the nurses' support. Children talked of the invasiveness on the physical self and also described misconceptions about the diagnosis. Parents felt guilty, thinking they had perhaps caused the disease through heredity or poor diet in the family setting, and expressed shock and heartbreak when learning of the diagnosis. Implications for care include: listening to concerns of all family members, identifying and clarifying misconceptions, providing opportunities for demonstration/return demonstration of skills, focused teaching of carb counting including foods often prepared at home, and providing positive support and reassurance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIn-Hospital Survival Skills Training for Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Children and Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158735-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">In-Hospital Survival Skills Training for Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Children and Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Cynthia, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family Health and Community Health Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3921</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caschmi@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Schmidt, L. Bernaix,, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL; M. Chiappetta, E. Carroll, A. Beland, Children's Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) for a child or adolescent is not only anxiety producing, but is also life-altering. At the time of diagnosis, parents and/or children must gain significant knowledge and learn specific skills in order to avoid life threatening episodes of abnormal blood glucose levels. This education, often called&quot;survival skills training,&quot; typically occurs during a 3-day hospital stay. The goal of this qualitative descriptive study, which was guided by Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (2001), was to describe children's and parents' perceptions of the initial in-hospital education and support received from nurses following the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. A child interview guide and written parent survey were developed, reviewed by a panel of experts, and piloted with 3 dyads. Children were interviewed and parents completed the survey immediately prior to the routine two-week post discharge appointment. Twenty-one children (8 boys and 13 girls) aged 8 to 15 years and their parent(s) participated in the study. Data were analyzed using the reductionistic and constructionistic steps described by Knafl and Webster (1988). Children and parents were satisfied with the support and survival skills training they received. Teaching strategies most appreciated by children were demonstration and return demonstration, supervision of skill performance, and encouraging comments made by nurses. Parents appreciated demonstration and positive feedback from the nurse directed to their child. Children and parents expressed their thoughts about the experience of the diagnosis itself and the importance of the nurses' support. Children talked of the invasiveness on the physical self and also described misconceptions about the diagnosis. Parents felt guilty, thinking they had perhaps caused the disease through heredity or poor diet in the family setting, and expressed shock and heartbreak when learning of the diagnosis. Implications for care include: listening to concerns of all family members, identifying and clarifying misconceptions, providing opportunities for demonstration/return demonstration of skills, focused teaching of carb counting including foods often prepared at home, and providing positive support and reassurance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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