Social Messages, Social Context and Teen Sexual Health: Voices of Urban African American Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158736
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Messages, Social Context and Teen Sexual Health: Voices of Urban African American Youth
Abstract:
Social Messages, Social Context and Teen Sexual Health: Voices of Urban African American Youth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Secor-Turner, Molly, Ph.D., MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Center for Adolescent Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-626-5618
Co-Authors:M. Secor-Turner, R.E. Sieving, Center for Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Secor-Turner, R.E. Sieving, A. Garwick, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Purpose: African American teens, especially low-income urban teens, experience disproportionately high rates of pregnancy and childbearing. The social contexts in which African American adolescents live significantly impact their decision making regarding sexual behavior and pregnancy. One important influence within the social contexts of African American youth is the social messages they receive, including race and gender stereotypes. This study aims to describe aspects of the social context that low-income, urban African American young women articulate as having influenced social messages they received during adolescence about sexual behaviors and beliefs about pregnancy timing. Conceptual Framework: This study is informed by the Theory of Triadic Influence, as well as by a theoretical understanding of sexual socialization and sexual scripting. Subjects: Purposive sampling was used to include 20 African American young women ages 18-22 who had and had not given birth as adolescents and whose families received public assistance during their adolescence. Methods: Structured individual interviews were conducted with all participants. Descriptive content analysis was used to categorize key concepts and patterns. Results: Five themes were identified that frame the context in which social messages received during adolescence influenced participants' decisions about sexual behaviors and beliefs about pregnancy timing: First Sex: Getting Ready and Getting It Over With; The Path for African American Girls; Gender Expectations: Insecurity and Independence; Living Into a Future; and Living in a Context of Instability and Uncertainty. In relation to their social context, participants clearly described perceived expectations for low-income African American young women that reflected their daily experiences with race, class and gender stereotypes. Conclusions: Findings portray a complex relationship between social context, social messages, and decisions about sexual behavior and pregnancy timing that reflects the intersection of race, class and gender stereotypes within the daily lives of low-income, urban African American youth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Messages, Social Context and Teen Sexual Health: Voices of Urban African American Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158736-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Messages, Social Context and Teen Sexual Health: Voices of Urban African American Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Secor-Turner, Molly, Ph.D., MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Center for Adolescent Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-626-5618</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seco0004@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Secor-Turner, R.E. Sieving, Center for Adolescent Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Secor-Turner, R.E. Sieving, A. Garwick, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: African American teens, especially low-income urban teens, experience disproportionately high rates of pregnancy and childbearing. The social contexts in which African American adolescents live significantly impact their decision making regarding sexual behavior and pregnancy. One important influence within the social contexts of African American youth is the social messages they receive, including race and gender stereotypes. This study aims to describe aspects of the social context that low-income, urban African American young women articulate as having influenced social messages they received during adolescence about sexual behaviors and beliefs about pregnancy timing. Conceptual Framework: This study is informed by the Theory of Triadic Influence, as well as by a theoretical understanding of sexual socialization and sexual scripting. Subjects: Purposive sampling was used to include 20 African American young women ages 18-22 who had and had not given birth as adolescents and whose families received public assistance during their adolescence. Methods: Structured individual interviews were conducted with all participants. Descriptive content analysis was used to categorize key concepts and patterns. Results: Five themes were identified that frame the context in which social messages received during adolescence influenced participants' decisions about sexual behaviors and beliefs about pregnancy timing: First Sex: Getting Ready and Getting It Over With; The Path for African American Girls; Gender Expectations: Insecurity and Independence; Living Into a Future; and Living in a Context of Instability and Uncertainty. In relation to their social context, participants clearly described perceived expectations for low-income African American young women that reflected their daily experiences with race, class and gender stereotypes. Conclusions: Findings portray a complex relationship between social context, social messages, and decisions about sexual behavior and pregnancy timing that reflects the intersection of race, class and gender stereotypes within the daily lives of low-income, urban African American youth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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