A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies Focused on Promoting Collaboration between Nurses and Physicians in the Acute Care Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158737
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies Focused on Promoting Collaboration between Nurses and Physicians in the Acute Care Setting
Abstract:
A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies Focused on Promoting Collaboration between Nurses and Physicians in the Acute Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Senn, Laura
P.I. Institution Name:Minnesota State University, Mankato
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:360 Wissink Hall, Mankato, MN, 56001, USA
Contact Telephone:507-389-6813
Co-Authors:L.A. Senn, School of Nursing, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Mankato, MN; J. Disch, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Aim: This paper is a report of a systematic review of experimental studies describing interventions that promote nurse-physician collaboration in U.S. hospitals, along with the outcomes measured. The review also illuminated design challenges commonly found. Background: It is believed that many healthcare errors can be prevented, and there is a significant relationship between the presence of excellent communication/collaboration between physician and nurses and improvements in patient outcomes. Increased collaboration has also been linked to professional satisfaction and nurse retention. Methods: The MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched using the key concepts of nurse-physician relationships, collaboration, and intervention/experimental studies. Studies published between 1986 and 2008 were included if reported in English, conducted in the United States, set in acute care, and reported an outcome after using an intervention to promote collaboration between nurses and doctors. Results: Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria. Outcomes focused on patient care were always reported as improved. Organization outcomes showed a decrease in length of stay and significant costs savings. Healthcare provider satisfaction and perceived collaboration showed mixed results. The intervention themes were: Partnered leadership, All staff conduct policies, Communication improvement, Nurse-driven physician adherence, Clinical expertise sharing, Unit-based interdisciplinary committees, Inter-professional knowledge development, Interdisciplinary patient-care teams, Interdisciplinary development of patient's plan of care, Access to information in a timely manner, and Increasing the visibility of collaboration in the workplace. Conclusion: Interdisciplinary rounds, interdisciplinary patient care teams, knowledge development, and timely access to information are the 4 threads found most often in studies with high quality designs. Significant cost savings and improvements in the quality of patient care were realized in most studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Systematic Review of Intervention Studies Focused on Promoting Collaboration between Nurses and Physicians in the Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158737-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies Focused on Promoting Collaboration between Nurses and Physicians in the Acute Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Senn, Laura</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Minnesota State University, Mankato</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">360 Wissink Hall, Mankato, MN, 56001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-389-6813</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">laura.senn@mnsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.A. Senn, School of Nursing, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Mankato, MN; J. Disch, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: This paper is a report of a systematic review of experimental studies describing interventions that promote nurse-physician collaboration in U.S. hospitals, along with the outcomes measured. The review also illuminated design challenges commonly found. Background: It is believed that many healthcare errors can be prevented, and there is a significant relationship between the presence of excellent communication/collaboration between physician and nurses and improvements in patient outcomes. Increased collaboration has also been linked to professional satisfaction and nurse retention. Methods: The MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched using the key concepts of nurse-physician relationships, collaboration, and intervention/experimental studies. Studies published between 1986 and 2008 were included if reported in English, conducted in the United States, set in acute care, and reported an outcome after using an intervention to promote collaboration between nurses and doctors. Results: Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria. Outcomes focused on patient care were always reported as improved. Organization outcomes showed a decrease in length of stay and significant costs savings. Healthcare provider satisfaction and perceived collaboration showed mixed results. The intervention themes were: Partnered leadership, All staff conduct policies, Communication improvement, Nurse-driven physician adherence, Clinical expertise sharing, Unit-based interdisciplinary committees, Inter-professional knowledge development, Interdisciplinary patient-care teams, Interdisciplinary development of patient's plan of care, Access to information in a timely manner, and Increasing the visibility of collaboration in the workplace. Conclusion: Interdisciplinary rounds, interdisciplinary patient care teams, knowledge development, and timely access to information are the 4 threads found most often in studies with high quality designs. Significant cost savings and improvements in the quality of patient care were realized in most studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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