2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive Symptoms among Deaf Adults: The Role of Culture
Abstract:
Depressive Symptoms among Deaf Adults: The Role of Culture
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sheppard, Kate, PhD, RN, APN
P.I. Institution Name:University Nevada Reno
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:PO BOX 767, Graeagle, CA, 96103, USA
Contact Telephone:530-836-4645
Co-Authors:K. Sheppard, Nursing, University Nevada Reno, Reno, CA;
Background: Culturally Deaf adults are those who lost hearing at early ages, who prefer to communicate in American Sign Language (ASL), and who self-identify as members of the Deaf culture. Deaf adults are at risk for symptoms of depression. Communication barriers frequently lead to experiences of isolation, low self-esteem, abuse, abandonment, and inadequate physical and mental health care. Deaf adults are not being adequately screened for symptoms of depression. Health care providers are rarely familiar with ASL, and depression screening tools are not easily translated from English to ASL. Method: Qualitative interviews. 9 culturally Deaf adults were interviewed three times each, and certified interpreters were used to enhance understanding. After reviewing each interview with the interpreter for accuracy of translation, text was generated through word-for-word transcription and researcher observations; text was then read to obtain a broad understanding of the experience. Findings: Symptoms described by Deaf adults paralleled those of hearing adults. Triggers for depressive symptoms related to the challenges of deafness, including feeling abandoned, feeling low self-esteem, anger, fear of the future, feeling limited by others, feeling isolation, and not feeling understood. Additional concerns included not wanting an interpreter when discussing personal issues, breaches of confidentiality with interpreter, not knowing how to access mental health care, not knowing who to turn to when in crisis, and negative interactions with health care providers. Inevitably, membership in the Deaf culture was the greatest modifier of depressive symptoms. Conclusions: This research provides a description of depressive symptoms as may occur among culturally Deaf adults, and may lead to increased understanding of depression as experienced by and expressed by members of the Deaf culture. In this way, improved communication and understanding between health care providers and Deaf adults can be optimized. Such knowledge may potentiate the earlier identification of culturally Deaf adults at risk for depression in the primary care setting, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality in this underserved population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive Symptoms among Deaf Adults: The Role of Cultureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressive Symptoms among Deaf Adults: The Role of Culture</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sheppard, Kate, PhD, RN, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Nevada Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO BOX 767, Graeagle, CA, 96103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">530-836-4645</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksheppard@psln.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Sheppard, Nursing, University Nevada Reno, Reno, CA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Culturally Deaf adults are those who lost hearing at early ages, who prefer to communicate in American Sign Language (ASL), and who self-identify as members of the Deaf culture. Deaf adults are at risk for symptoms of depression. Communication barriers frequently lead to experiences of isolation, low self-esteem, abuse, abandonment, and inadequate physical and mental health care. Deaf adults are not being adequately screened for symptoms of depression. Health care providers are rarely familiar with ASL, and depression screening tools are not easily translated from English to ASL. Method: Qualitative interviews. 9 culturally Deaf adults were interviewed three times each, and certified interpreters were used to enhance understanding. After reviewing each interview with the interpreter for accuracy of translation, text was generated through word-for-word transcription and researcher observations; text was then read to obtain a broad understanding of the experience. Findings: Symptoms described by Deaf adults paralleled those of hearing adults. Triggers for depressive symptoms related to the challenges of deafness, including feeling abandoned, feeling low self-esteem, anger, fear of the future, feeling limited by others, feeling isolation, and not feeling understood. Additional concerns included not wanting an interpreter when discussing personal issues, breaches of confidentiality with interpreter, not knowing how to access mental health care, not knowing who to turn to when in crisis, and negative interactions with health care providers. Inevitably, membership in the Deaf culture was the greatest modifier of depressive symptoms. Conclusions: This research provides a description of depressive symptoms as may occur among culturally Deaf adults, and may lead to increased understanding of depression as experienced by and expressed by members of the Deaf culture. In this way, improved communication and understanding between health care providers and Deaf adults can be optimized. Such knowledge may potentiate the earlier identification of culturally Deaf adults at risk for depression in the primary care setting, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality in this underserved population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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