Is Low Health Literacy Associated with Pregnant Women's Use of Information Sources and with Barriers to Information Seeking?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158739
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Low Health Literacy Associated with Pregnant Women's Use of Information Sources and with Barriers to Information Seeking?
Abstract:
Is Low Health Literacy Associated with Pregnant Women's Use of Information Sources and with Barriers to Information Seeking?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shieh, Carol, RNC, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Contact Address:1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-1575
Co-Authors:C. Shieh, R. Mays, A. McDaniel, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; A. McDaniel, Indiana University School of Informatics, Indianapolis, IN; J. Yu, , Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences, Bloomington, IN;
Purpose: Low health literacy (LHL) results in poor pregnancy health knowledge; its mechanism, however, is not clear. We speculated that low health literacy is associated with the use of certain information sources and with certain barriers to information seeking. This study investigated this association. Conceptual framework: Healthy People 2010 defined health literacy as an individual's capacity to obtain, process, and understand health information. A socio-ecological framework was used to describe personal and contextual barriers to information seeking. Subjects: 143 English-speaking low income adult pregnant women from a prenatal clinic in a Midwestern city participated in the study. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Participants were grouped into either low (<= 30) or high (> 30) health literacy based on their scores from the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Participants rated 8 information sources regarding mass media, written materials, Internet, and interpersonal networks as rarely or frequently used. They reported whether they had experienced 6 personal (beliefs and self-efficacy) as well as 6 contextual barriers (availability and affordability of information) to information seeking. Data analysis involved Fisher's exact test and permutation resampling method. Results: About 15% of the participants demonstrated LHL. Higher percentages of women in LHL group were minorities, aged 30 or older, lacking car ownership, and without Internet access. Compared to high health literacy group, LHL women were less likely to use the Internet (14.3% vs 46.7%, p = .04), and were more likely to report personal barriers in self care skills (42.9% vs 13.1%, p = .02) and not knowing how to use the Internet (33.3% vs 6.6%, p = .01). No differences were found in contextual barriers. Conclusions: LHL is associated with less Internet use and insufficient Internet skills. Interventions to promote Internet self-efficacy skills for LHL women are indicated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Low Health Literacy Associated with Pregnant Women's Use of Information Sources and with Barriers to Information Seeking?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158739-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is Low Health Literacy Associated with Pregnant Women's Use of Information Sources and with Barriers to Information Seeking?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shieh, Carol, RNC, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-1575</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wshieh@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Shieh, R. Mays, A. McDaniel, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; A. McDaniel, Indiana University School of Informatics, Indianapolis, IN; J. Yu, , Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences, Bloomington, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Low health literacy (LHL) results in poor pregnancy health knowledge; its mechanism, however, is not clear. We speculated that low health literacy is associated with the use of certain information sources and with certain barriers to information seeking. This study investigated this association. Conceptual framework: Healthy People 2010 defined health literacy as an individual's capacity to obtain, process, and understand health information. A socio-ecological framework was used to describe personal and contextual barriers to information seeking. Subjects: 143 English-speaking low income adult pregnant women from a prenatal clinic in a Midwestern city participated in the study. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Participants were grouped into either low (&lt;= 30) or high (&gt; 30) health literacy based on their scores from the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Participants rated 8 information sources regarding mass media, written materials, Internet, and interpersonal networks as rarely or frequently used. They reported whether they had experienced 6 personal (beliefs and self-efficacy) as well as 6 contextual barriers (availability and affordability of information) to information seeking. Data analysis involved Fisher's exact test and permutation resampling method. Results: About 15% of the participants demonstrated LHL. Higher percentages of women in LHL group were minorities, aged 30 or older, lacking car ownership, and without Internet access. Compared to high health literacy group, LHL women were less likely to use the Internet (14.3% vs 46.7%, p = .04), and were more likely to report personal barriers in self care skills (42.9% vs 13.1%, p = .02) and not knowing how to use the Internet (33.3% vs 6.6%, p = .01). No differences were found in contextual barriers. Conclusions: LHL is associated with less Internet use and insufficient Internet skills. Interventions to promote Internet self-efficacy skills for LHL women are indicated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:20:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:20:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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