2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Healthy Eating in Korean American Adults
Abstract:
Predictors of Healthy Eating in Korean American Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shin, Cha-Nam
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1870 Cobblestone Way S., Terre Haute, IN, 47802, USA
Contact Telephone:812-273-3682
Co-Authors:C. Shin, Nursing, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN; H.W. Lach, Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;
Problem: Poor diet is a major focus area of Healthy People 2010, yet little is known about eating habits of Korean Americans, a growing segment of the population. Purpose: This study examined factors influencing eating habits of Korean American adults in order to design culturally appropriate interventions. Theoretical Framework: Pender's Health Promotion Model. Subjects: Participants were 261 Korean American adults recruited through the Korean community of a Midwestern city, who could complete the survey in English. Methodology: A mailed survey measured health, acculturation, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for healthy eating, and self-reported eating patterns. Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. Results: The sample was 52.9% female with a mean age of 39.4 plus or minus 15.1. Mean HPLP II nutrition scores were 2.00 plus or minus 0.44, and participants reported retaining traditional Korean diets despite level of acculturation. Poor eating habits were seen in participants who were younger (t=1.80), unmarried (F=3.20), and less educated (F=5.03) at the p-value less than .05. Predictors of healthy eating were explored and the model demonstrated a good fit to the data: RMSEA (.06), chi² (1561.42, p<.01, df=;843, chi²/df<2), and NNFI and CFI (>.90). Acculturation, physical health, and mental health accounted for 10.4% of the variance in benefits, 7.7% in barriers, and 1.4% in self-efficacy. The model explained 8.6% of the variance in healthy eating. The predictors of healthy eating were mental health (beta = .36), self-efficacy (beta = .34), and benefits (beta = .27). Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study reveal the necessity of developing culturally appropriate interventions and additional research is needed to understand the relationships among the health promotion model variables.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Healthy Eating in Korean American Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Healthy Eating in Korean American Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Cha-Nam</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1870 Cobblestone Way S., Terre Haute, IN, 47802, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-273-3682</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cshin1@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Shin, Nursing, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN; H.W. Lach, Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Poor diet is a major focus area of Healthy People 2010, yet little is known about eating habits of Korean Americans, a growing segment of the population. Purpose: This study examined factors influencing eating habits of Korean American adults in order to design culturally appropriate interventions. Theoretical Framework: Pender's Health Promotion Model. Subjects: Participants were 261 Korean American adults recruited through the Korean community of a Midwestern city, who could complete the survey in English. Methodology: A mailed survey measured health, acculturation, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy for healthy eating, and self-reported eating patterns. Structural equation modeling was used for analysis. Results: The sample was 52.9% female with a mean age of 39.4 plus or minus 15.1. Mean HPLP II nutrition scores were 2.00 plus or minus 0.44, and participants reported retaining traditional Korean diets despite level of acculturation. Poor eating habits were seen in participants who were younger (t=1.80), unmarried (F=3.20), and less educated (F=5.03) at the p-value less than .05. Predictors of healthy eating were explored and the model demonstrated a good fit to the data: RMSEA (.06), chi&sup2; (1561.42, p&lt;.01, df=;843, chi&sup2;/df&lt;2), and NNFI and CFI (&gt;.90). Acculturation, physical health, and mental health accounted for 10.4% of the variance in benefits, 7.7% in barriers, and 1.4% in self-efficacy. The model explained 8.6% of the variance in healthy eating. The predictors of healthy eating were mental health (beta = .36), self-efficacy (beta = .34), and benefits (beta = .27). Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study reveal the necessity of developing culturally appropriate interventions and additional research is needed to understand the relationships among the health promotion model variables.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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