The Dance: The Lived Experience of Nurse Educators when Teaching Maternal-Child Nursing to Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158743
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Dance: The Lived Experience of Nurse Educators when Teaching Maternal-Child Nursing to Men
Abstract:
The Dance: The Lived Experience of Nurse Educators when Teaching Maternal-Child Nursing to Men
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Strong-Anthony, Ann, Ph.D.(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:20600 E. 126th St. N., Claremore, OK, 74019, USA
Contact Telephone:9183441813
Co-Authors:A. Strong Anthony, Environments of Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; R.S. Sloan, Family Health Nursing, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;
Men report apprehension about the maternal-child (MCH) experience and its focus on intimate care of women. Nurse Educators (NEs) may influence men's perceptions of this rotation. We explored NEs' experiences when teaching MCH to men, the meaning attributed to these experiences, and how interaction between NEs/learner influenced the learning process from the perspective of the NE. Interpretative phenomenology, a qualitative approach, explores what is unknown about a phenomenon by surfacing factors that lie behind the experience. Everyday experiences that otherwise might be overlooked emerged through the participants' stories. Gender and role theory provided context for understanding male learning needs during MCH. The target population was experienced nursing faculty teaching MCH. Purposive sampling identified NEs in nursing programs in the Midwest. Four NEs with 12.5 years (average) MCH teaching experience in five states participated. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, de-identified then analyzed using hermeneutic principles. Analysis included three levels: 1) during the interview, 2) individual transcripts, and 3) shared experiences found across all transcripts. Interpretations were shared among the researchers to ensure that all possible meanings were considered. Results and Implications: An intricate dance emerged as a metaphor for teaching nursing to men. Students, nursing staff, patients, families, and the NE are all involved in the dance and appear as partners, ensembles or soloists. NE directs the dance as guide, facilitator, coach, and choreographer. The nursing dance has four movements: 1. Stage fright; 2. Cues and Miscues; 3. Dialogue with the chorus; 4. Working the system ballet. Three themes were identified. During the MCH rotation, NEs 1) address gender-based learning differences, 2) recognize and manage vulnerable behaviors; withdrawal, lack of initiative, argumentative responses, and/or lashing out, and 3)find that meeting men's learning needs requires significant "behind the scenes" effort. Future research will seek to clarify the dissonance in NEs' and men's perceptions, identify "best practices" in nursing education that address gender-based learning needs, and identify retention strategies for nursing education programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Dance: The Lived Experience of Nurse Educators when Teaching Maternal-Child Nursing to Menen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158743-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Dance: The Lived Experience of Nurse Educators when Teaching Maternal-Child Nursing to Men</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Strong-Anthony, Ann, Ph.D.(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">20600 E. 126th St. N., Claremore, OK, 74019, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9183441813</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">a2anthony@atlasok.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Strong Anthony, Environments of Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; R.S. Sloan, Family Health Nursing, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Men report apprehension about the maternal-child (MCH) experience and its focus on intimate care of women. Nurse Educators (NEs) may influence men's perceptions of this rotation. We explored NEs' experiences when teaching MCH to men, the meaning attributed to these experiences, and how interaction between NEs/learner influenced the learning process from the perspective of the NE. Interpretative phenomenology, a qualitative approach, explores what is unknown about a phenomenon by surfacing factors that lie behind the experience. Everyday experiences that otherwise might be overlooked emerged through the participants' stories. Gender and role theory provided context for understanding male learning needs during MCH. The target population was experienced nursing faculty teaching MCH. Purposive sampling identified NEs in nursing programs in the Midwest. Four NEs with 12.5 years (average) MCH teaching experience in five states participated. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, de-identified then analyzed using hermeneutic principles. Analysis included three levels: 1) during the interview, 2) individual transcripts, and 3) shared experiences found across all transcripts. Interpretations were shared among the researchers to ensure that all possible meanings were considered. Results and Implications: An intricate dance emerged as a metaphor for teaching nursing to men. Students, nursing staff, patients, families, and the NE are all involved in the dance and appear as partners, ensembles or soloists. NE directs the dance as guide, facilitator, coach, and choreographer. The nursing dance has four movements: 1. Stage fright; 2. Cues and Miscues; 3. Dialogue with the chorus; 4. Working the system ballet. Three themes were identified. During the MCH rotation, NEs 1) address gender-based learning differences, 2) recognize and manage vulnerable behaviors; withdrawal, lack of initiative, argumentative responses, and/or lashing out, and 3)find that meeting men's learning needs requires significant &quot;behind the scenes&quot; effort. Future research will seek to clarify the dissonance in NEs' and men's perceptions, identify &quot;best practices&quot; in nursing education that address gender-based learning needs, and identify retention strategies for nursing education programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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