2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158747
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Fear of Falling Contribute to Disability in Older Women?
Abstract:
Does Fear of Falling Contribute to Disability in Older Women?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Talley, Kristine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55079, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-9412
Co-Authors:K.M. Talley, J.F. Wyman, C.R. Gross, R.L. Lindquist, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; C.R. Gross, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Fear of falling is emerging as a common, but preventable risk factor for escalating disability in older women. The purpose of this study was to describe how fear of falling changes over time and to identify predictors of these changes and their disabling consequences, so that evidenced-based treatments can be optimally designed. Using the disablement process model as a framework, it was hypothesized that fear of falling would increase over two years, be associated with predisposing risk factors and pathologies, and contribute to increasing impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities. A secondary analysis of data was done using data from 272 cognitively intact, non-exercising community-dwelling older women (mean age 78.8) enrolled in a fall prevention clinical trial. Generalized linear mixed models described fear of falling and disability growth curves. Fear of falling measured by the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale varied at baseline (p<.001) and increased linearly over two years (p<.001). Predisposing risk factors and pathologies significantly associated (p<.05) with fear of falling growth parameters in univariate models were included in a multivariate model to identify independent predictors of change. In the multivariate model baseline fear of falling varied significantly (p<.001) and was associated with poor physical function (p<.001) and mental health (p=.03). The linear change parameter was not significant, but specific tests indicated poor emotional health (p=.04) and urological disorders (p=.04) predicted change. Increasing fear of falling was associated with increasing impairments in balance (p<.001), and hip flexion strength (p<.05); functional limitations in mobility (p<.001), and rising from a chair (p<.001); and disabilities in physical activity levels (p<.001), activity restrictions (p<.001), and social support (p<.001). Fear of falling increased over time, but few well-know correlates predicted this change. It also contributed to escalating disability at all stages of the disablement process. It is recommended that fear of falling be included in disability research and that greater attention to its risk factors be given in practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Fear of Falling Contribute to Disability in Older Women?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158747-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Fear of Falling Contribute to Disability in Older Women?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Talley, Kristine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-9412</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carl0106@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.M. Talley, J.F. Wyman, C.R. Gross, R.L. Lindquist, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; C.R. Gross, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fear of falling is emerging as a common, but preventable risk factor for escalating disability in older women. The purpose of this study was to describe how fear of falling changes over time and to identify predictors of these changes and their disabling consequences, so that evidenced-based treatments can be optimally designed. Using the disablement process model as a framework, it was hypothesized that fear of falling would increase over two years, be associated with predisposing risk factors and pathologies, and contribute to increasing impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities. A secondary analysis of data was done using data from 272 cognitively intact, non-exercising community-dwelling older women (mean age 78.8) enrolled in a fall prevention clinical trial. Generalized linear mixed models described fear of falling and disability growth curves. Fear of falling measured by the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale varied at baseline (p&lt;.001) and increased linearly over two years (p&lt;.001). Predisposing risk factors and pathologies significantly associated (p&lt;.05) with fear of falling growth parameters in univariate models were included in a multivariate model to identify independent predictors of change. In the multivariate model baseline fear of falling varied significantly (p&lt;.001) and was associated with poor physical function (p&lt;.001) and mental health (p=.03). The linear change parameter was not significant, but specific tests indicated poor emotional health (p=.04) and urological disorders (p=.04) predicted change. Increasing fear of falling was associated with increasing impairments in balance (p&lt;.001), and hip flexion strength (p&lt;.05); functional limitations in mobility (p&lt;.001), and rising from a chair (p&lt;.001); and disabilities in physical activity levels (p&lt;.001), activity restrictions (p&lt;.001), and social support (p&lt;.001). Fear of falling increased over time, but few well-know correlates predicted this change. It also contributed to escalating disability at all stages of the disablement process. It is recommended that fear of falling be included in disability research and that greater attention to its risk factors be given in practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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