2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Exclusivity and Duration in a WIC Sample
Abstract:
Predictors of Exclusivity and Duration in a WIC Sample
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tenfelde, Sandi, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Avenue, MC 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-2496
Co-Authors:S.M. Tenfelde, L. Finnegan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Purpose: When compared with low-income women who are not receiving nutrition services from the federally-funded Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, WIC recipients are 23% less likely to initiate breastfeeding, less than half as likely to exclusively breastfeed, and breastfeed their infants for shorter durations. The purpose of this study was to examine determinants of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration in low-income WIC participants who initiated breastfeeding immediately after delivery. Conceptual Framework, Participants, and Methods: Selected components of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior guided this secondary analysis of existing longitudinal data from 312 breastfeeding women who received services from an urban WIC clinic. Demographic and health variables, measures of knowledge and motivation, and measures of breastfeeding exclusivity (length of time infant received breast milk without supplementation) and duration (length of time infant received any breast milk) were constructed from administrative data and WIC survey questions. Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to study the probability and determinants of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration at 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. Results: Participants were 18 to 44 years old (mean age 26), all low income, 20% African American, and 76% Hispanic ethnicity. The probability of breastfeeding exclusively declined rapidly to 10% within the first week postpartum (see Figure 1). By six months postpartum, the probability of any breastfeeding for all women was 25%. Compared with women of Mexican descent, women who were of other Hispanic ethnicities and women who were not Hispanic were significantly less likely to continue breastfeeding at six months postpartum (see Figure 2). The top three reasons for discontinuing breastfeeding were perceived inadequate milk supply (46%), return to work or school (12%), and infant weaned self (12%). Conclusions: Further studies are indicated to design and test interventions that are culturally targeted to specific ethnic groups (e.g. Mexican and other Hispanic subgroups) and tailored to the modifiable predictors of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration in women who are receiving WIC services.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Exclusivity and Duration in a WIC Sampleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Exclusivity and Duration in a WIC Sample</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tenfelde, Sandi, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Avenue, MC 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-2496</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stenfeld@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. Tenfelde, L. Finnegan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: When compared with low-income women who are not receiving nutrition services from the federally-funded Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, WIC recipients are 23% less likely to initiate breastfeeding, less than half as likely to exclusively breastfeed, and breastfeed their infants for shorter durations. The purpose of this study was to examine determinants of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration in low-income WIC participants who initiated breastfeeding immediately after delivery. Conceptual Framework, Participants, and Methods: Selected components of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior guided this secondary analysis of existing longitudinal data from 312 breastfeeding women who received services from an urban WIC clinic. Demographic and health variables, measures of knowledge and motivation, and measures of breastfeeding exclusivity (length of time infant received breast milk without supplementation) and duration (length of time infant received any breast milk) were constructed from administrative data and WIC survey questions. Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to study the probability and determinants of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration at 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. Results: Participants were 18 to 44 years old (mean age 26), all low income, 20% African American, and 76% Hispanic ethnicity. The probability of breastfeeding exclusively declined rapidly to 10% within the first week postpartum (see Figure 1). By six months postpartum, the probability of any breastfeeding for all women was 25%. Compared with women of Mexican descent, women who were of other Hispanic ethnicities and women who were not Hispanic were significantly less likely to continue breastfeeding at six months postpartum (see Figure 2). The top three reasons for discontinuing breastfeeding were perceived inadequate milk supply (46%), return to work or school (12%), and infant weaned self (12%). Conclusions: Further studies are indicated to design and test interventions that are culturally targeted to specific ethnic groups (e.g. Mexican and other Hispanic subgroups) and tailored to the modifiable predictors of breastfeeding exclusivity and duration in women who are receiving WIC services.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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