Waiting in Defeat: A Coping Pattern for Individuals with Mental Illnesses, Drug and/or Alcohol Addiction, and Physical Chronic Illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158749
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Waiting in Defeat: A Coping Pattern for Individuals with Mental Illnesses, Drug and/or Alcohol Addiction, and Physical Chronic Illnesses
Abstract:
Waiting in Defeat: A Coping Pattern for Individuals with Mental Illnesses, Drug and/or Alcohol Addiction, and Physical Chronic Illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Villena, Anna Liza, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Anna Liza Villena
Contact Address:1810 Ashland, Upper Arlington, OH, 43212, USA
Contact Telephone:510 367-2239
Co-Authors:A.D. Villena, College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;
Purpose: The purpose of this interpretive study was to describe how individuals with co-occurring disorders of mental illness and substance abuse manage chronic medical illnesses. Background & Significance: Thirty three million people suffer from substance abuse disorder and up to half of these have co-occurring disorders (COD) of both mental illness and substance abuse. A majority of persons with COD (61%) have received no treatment for either illness. Persons with COD exert substantial burden on health systems; They have disproportionately high rates of chronic medical conditions (i.e. hepatitis C, HIV), over utilize emergent services and are re-hospitalized frequently. Little research exists that describes how this population manages medical conditions while at the same time living with a psychiatric illness and substance abuse or dependence. Method: A purposive sample of twenty individuals with COD (11 males; 9 females) was recruited from community treatment centers and supportive housing sites. Participants were interviewed for one hour on two occasions. Interviews focused on health understandings, illness management narratives and narratives of positive and negative experiences with receipt of care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Interpretive narrative analysis was employed to examine common and distinct experiences of participants in managing their care in the community. Findings: Three distinct patterns of coping with chronic illness in persons with COD were observed: (a) Interconnectedness, (b) Ambivalence, and (c) Waiting in Defeat. Persons with COD who were interconnected had significant relationships with family members, friends, and healthcare providers that facilitated attention to and management of chronic health conditions. Each identified key relationships and/or events that positively influenced self care. In contrast those with ambivalent coping were strongly influenced by past negative experiences in seeking health care; they were continued to pursue help, but were doubtful of its potential. Patients waiting in defeat, exhibited hopelessness, helplessness, and a generalized response that suggested that health care offered few substantial, positive possibilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWaiting in Defeat: A Coping Pattern for Individuals with Mental Illnesses, Drug and/or Alcohol Addiction, and Physical Chronic Illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158749-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Waiting in Defeat: A Coping Pattern for Individuals with Mental Illnesses, Drug and/or Alcohol Addiction, and Physical Chronic Illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Villena, Anna Liza, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Anna Liza Villena</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1810 Ashland, Upper Arlington, OH, 43212, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">510 367-2239</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">villena71@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.D. Villena, College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this interpretive study was to describe how individuals with co-occurring disorders of mental illness and substance abuse manage chronic medical illnesses. Background &amp; Significance: Thirty three million people suffer from substance abuse disorder and up to half of these have co-occurring disorders (COD) of both mental illness and substance abuse. A majority of persons with COD (61%) have received no treatment for either illness. Persons with COD exert substantial burden on health systems; They have disproportionately high rates of chronic medical conditions (i.e. hepatitis C, HIV), over utilize emergent services and are re-hospitalized frequently. Little research exists that describes how this population manages medical conditions while at the same time living with a psychiatric illness and substance abuse or dependence. Method: A purposive sample of twenty individuals with COD (11 males; 9 females) was recruited from community treatment centers and supportive housing sites. Participants were interviewed for one hour on two occasions. Interviews focused on health understandings, illness management narratives and narratives of positive and negative experiences with receipt of care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Interpretive narrative analysis was employed to examine common and distinct experiences of participants in managing their care in the community. Findings: Three distinct patterns of coping with chronic illness in persons with COD were observed: (a) Interconnectedness, (b) Ambivalence, and (c) Waiting in Defeat. Persons with COD who were interconnected had significant relationships with family members, friends, and healthcare providers that facilitated attention to and management of chronic health conditions. Each identified key relationships and/or events that positively influenced self care. In contrast those with ambivalent coping were strongly influenced by past negative experiences in seeking health care; they were continued to pursue help, but were doubtful of its potential. Patients waiting in defeat, exhibited hopelessness, helplessness, and a generalized response that suggested that health care offered few substantial, positive possibilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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