Understanding The Usage of the Glycemic Index among African Americans with Type II Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding The Usage of the Glycemic Index among African Americans with Type II Diabetes
Abstract:
Understanding The Usage of the Glycemic Index among African Americans with Type II Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Waller, Beverly, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:8107 Autumn Woods Tr., Ypsilanti, MI, 48198, USA
Contact Telephone:734-544-8035
Co-Authors:B. Waller, H. Tzeng, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
African Americans have a disproportionately higher prevalence and severity of type II diabetes compared to Caucasian Americans. Orem's self-care model identifies health education as a service provided by nurses that increase one's self-care. The glycemic index (GI) has been shown to be a useful dietary self-care tool for controlling blood glucose levels. However, information on GI understanding and usage among African American (AA) type II diabetics (T2DMs) is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which AAs with T2DM are receiving information on GI, as well as their understanding and use of it. The Diabetic Glycemic Index Knowledge and Usage Questionnaire was used to gather demographic, disease related, and GI knowledge and usage data. A convenience sample of 60 adult AA T2DMs from three AA churches was used. IRB approval was obtained. All data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. The results showed that 50% (n = 30) of the participants reported receiving information on GI. Attending diabetes education classes was related to receiving GI information chi² (1, N = 60) = 6.90, p = .009. Higher levels of GI understanding were associated with higher levels of GI usage (r = .79, p<.0005). Understanding (t(35) = -2.61, p = .013) and usage (t(42) = -2.16, p = .037) of GI were higher among those who had attended diabetes education classes then those who had not. No significant differences were found in regards to age, sex, education, income, or BMI on GI understanding and usage. The results of the study indicated that GI is not consistently taught. Although 73% of participants attended diabetes education classes, only 50% reporting receiving GI education. Use of Certified Nurse Diabetes Educators may be a positive step in providing consistent and up-to-date diabetes care information to African American type II diabetics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding The Usage of the Glycemic Index among African Americans with Type II Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding The Usage of the Glycemic Index among African Americans with Type II Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Waller, Beverly, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8107 Autumn Woods Tr., Ypsilanti, MI, 48198, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-544-8035</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bevw@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Waller, H. Tzeng, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African Americans have a disproportionately higher prevalence and severity of type II diabetes compared to Caucasian Americans. Orem's self-care model identifies health education as a service provided by nurses that increase one's self-care. The glycemic index (GI) has been shown to be a useful dietary self-care tool for controlling blood glucose levels. However, information on GI understanding and usage among African American (AA) type II diabetics (T2DMs) is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which AAs with T2DM are receiving information on GI, as well as their understanding and use of it. The Diabetic Glycemic Index Knowledge and Usage Questionnaire was used to gather demographic, disease related, and GI knowledge and usage data. A convenience sample of 60 adult AA T2DMs from three AA churches was used. IRB approval was obtained. All data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. The results showed that 50% (n = 30) of the participants reported receiving information on GI. Attending diabetes education classes was related to receiving GI information chi&sup2; (1, N = 60) = 6.90, p = .009. Higher levels of GI understanding were associated with higher levels of GI usage (r = .79, p&lt;.0005). Understanding (t(35) = -2.61, p = .013) and usage (t(42) = -2.16, p = .037) of GI were higher among those who had attended diabetes education classes then those who had not. No significant differences were found in regards to age, sex, education, income, or BMI on GI understanding and usage. The results of the study indicated that GI is not consistently taught. Although 73% of participants attended diabetes education classes, only 50% reporting receiving GI education. Use of Certified Nurse Diabetes Educators may be a positive step in providing consistent and up-to-date diabetes care information to African American type II diabetics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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